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1882. 



CONSTITUTION 



PLAYING RULES 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION, 

Including the Proceedings of the League Congress held in Saratoga and 

Chicago. 18S1, Rochester, N. Y., 18S2, and the Official Fielding and 

Batting Averages of l'layers in Championship Games in 1881. 



CHICAGO: 
Published by A. G. Spalding & Bros., 

108 MADISON STREET. 

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1882, by A. G. Spalmmo 
A Bros., in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, in Washington, 















Correct 


D 


lagram of 


a 


Ball 


Ground. 


no 

• 




Omtra 

• 






• 




A. A. A.— Ground reserved for Umpire, Batsman and Catcher. 

R. B. It. —^Wound reserved ft Captaim aad Atwitint. 
C— Players Bench. 
P. — Visiting Players Bat Rack. 
E.— Home Players Bat Back. 



INDEX 

TO THE 

OOITSTITIJTIOIT. 

Section. 

Name I 

Objects 2 

MEMBERSHIP. 

Members for 1882 3 

Not more than One Club Member from any City 4 

Population of Eligible City 5 

Mode of Applying for Membership 6-7 

Election of Club Member 7 

Mode of Filling Vacancy in Club Membership 8 

Membership of Umpires, Managers and Players 9 

Honorary Membership 10 

League Alliance Clubs and Players Honorary Members. . 10 

Forfeiture of League Club Membership 11 

" League Alliance Club Honorary Membership. . 12 

" Membership of Umpire, Manager or Player .. . 13 

" Membership, how enforced and effect thereof. . 14 

Forfeited Membership, how Revoked 15 

Disqualified Persons, Secretary's Record and Notice 16 

DUES. 

Dues of League Club 17 

" " League Alliance Club 18 

OFFICERS. 

President, Election and Duties of. 19 

Board of Directors, Election of. 20 

Directors, Qualifications of. 21 

Board of Directors, Duties of 22 

" " " Meetings of 23 

" " " Reportsof. 24 

" " " ' Proceedings of, not to be Disclosed ... 25 

" " " Filling Vacancy in 26 



INDEX TO THE CONSTITUTION 



Section . 

Secretary, How Elected 27 

" to be Treasurer 2 ° 

" General Duties of. *9 

" to Record and Report Violations of Rules and 

Regulations 30 

Secretary, Salary and Guaranties 3 1 

LEAGUE CLUB, UMPIRES, MANAGERS AND 
PLAYERS. 

Club, Jurisdiction of its affairs 3* 

" " " Territory 33 

Restriction as to Games 33 

Contract with Manager or Player • ■ ■ • 34 

Player not under Contract, what Gaines he may Play in. . 34 

Notice of Contract with Manager or Player 35 

Release from Contract, Notification of. 3^ 

'« " " Effect of 37 

When Manager or Player may immediately Engage with 

another Club 3^ 

When Manager or Player becomes Ineligible 39 

Clubs Forbidden to Employ Disqualified Persons 40 

" " " Play Clubs Employing Disqualified 

Persons 4 1 

Manager or Player, when to Report Grievance 42 

" " " Causes of Expulsion of 42-43 

" " " " " Suspension of .... 44 

Umpire, Causes of Disqualification of. . . 45 

THE LEAGUE ALLIANCE. 

Membership, Qualifications for 46 

" Election to 46 

League Alliance Agreement 47 

League Secretary to Issue Notices 48 

" Board to Adjudicate Disputes 49 

" Club Forbidden to Employ Player under Contract 

with or Expelled from League Alliance Club 50 

League Alliance Club Forbidden to Employ Player under 
Contract with League Club, or Expelled or Sus- 
pended from the League 51 

League Alliance, representation of, at Annual League 

Meeting 52 

League Alliance Championship 53 

League Club to Play no Game in League Alliance City 

except with League Alliance Club 54 



OP PROFESSIONAL BASE JiALL CLUBS. 



Section .* 

Regulations for Admission to Games 55 

Definition of "Gross " and " Gate ' Receipts , 56 

Division of Receipts, Regulations for 57 

Clubs Ineligible to Membership 58 

DISPUTES AND COMPLAINTS. 

Disputes between Clubs, how Adjudicated 59 

Complaint of Club against Manager or Player of another 

Club 60 

Appeal of Manager or Player 61 

When Director is Ineligible to try a Case 63 

Expenses of Trials and Arbitrations 63 

PLAYING RULES. 

When Enacted and Amended 64 

CHAMPIONSHIP. 

Championship to be contended for yearly 65 

" Season 6o 

' ' Games, What are 67 

'< " Number of, in Series 68 

Tie, or Drawn Games, How Played off 68 

Home Club Entitled to Half of Series on its Grounds 69 

" " to Control Exhibition of Game 69 

" " to be Furnished Batting Order of Visiting Club. 69 

Championship Schedule 7° 

Schedule Date not to be Changed Except 70 

Admission to Championship Game, Price of 71 

Correspondence Concerning Championship Games, by 

whom Conducted ' 7 3 

Receipts of Championship Games, Statement and Pay- 

m.entof. 73 

Admiss on to Championship Games, how Regulated 73 

When Visiting Club Entitled to Share of Receipts 73 

Visiting Club to Pay Umpire 74 

League Games Forbidden Prior to Championship Season. 75 
Games Between League and Non-League Clubs, Regula- 
tions Governing • • ■ 7" 

Games Between League and Non-League Clubs, Division 

ofRcceipts (1.3) 76 

Games Between League and Non-League Clubs, Penalty 

for Non-Payment (3> 4) 7 6 

Count of Forfeited Games 77 



6 INDEX TO THE CONSTITUTION. 

Section. 
Drawn, Tie, or Postponed Games not to Count, but be 

Played off. 78 

The Champion Club 79 

Emblem of Championship 79 

Mode of Deciding Championship 80 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Time and Place 81 

Delegates and Visitors 8* 

Quorum 83 

Order of Business 84 

AMENDMENTS. 

Two-thirds Vote at Annual Meeting Required 85 



II 



CONSTITUTION 



— OF THE — 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



Professional Base Ball Clubs, 



1882. 



NAME. 



SECTION i. This Association shall be called 
" The National League of Professional 
Base Ball Clubs." 

OBJECTS. 

SECTION 2. The objects of this League are: 

1st. To encourage, foster, and elevate the 
game of base ball; to enact and enforce proper 
rules for the exhibition and conduct of the game, 
and to make base ball playing respectable and 
honorable. 

2d. To protect and promote the mutual in- 
terests of professional base ball clubs and profes- 
sional base ball players, and, 

3d. To establish and regulate the base ball 
championship of the United States. 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 






MEMBERSHIP. 

SECTION 3. This League shall consist of the 
following named professional base ball clubs : 

Boston B. B. Association, of Boston, Mass. 

Buffalo B. B. Association, of Buffalo, N. Y. 

Chicago Ball Club, of Chicago, 111. 

Detroit B. B. Club, of Detroit, Mich. 

Cleveland B. B. Club, of Cleveland, Ohio. 

Providence B. B. Association, of Providence, 
R. I. 

Troy B. B. Association, of Troy, N. Y. 

Worcester B. B. Club, of Worcester, Mass. 

And such other professional base ball clubs as 
may from time to time be elected to membership. 

Sec. 4. No club shall be admitted from cither 
of the cities above named, other than the clubs 
mentioned, except in the event that cither of such 
clubs shall lose its membership, and in no event 
shall there be more than one club from any city. 

Sec. 5. No club shall be admitted from any 
city whose population is less than seventy-five 
thousand (75,000), except by unanimous vote of 
the League. 

Sec. 6. No club shall be admitted unless it 
shall first have delivered to the Secretary of the 
League, at least five days before the annual meet- 
ing, a written application for membership, signed 
by its President and Secretary, accompanied by 
documents showing that such club bears the name 
of the city in which it is located, and that it is 
regularly organized and officered, and, where the 
State law permits it, chartered. Such application 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



9 



shall at once be transmitted by the Secretary to 
the President of the League, who shall forthwith 
refer it to a committee of three members of the 
Board of Directors, appointed by him, who shall 
immediately investigate and report upon said 
application; said report to be communicated to 
the League through the Secretary. 

Sec. 7. The voting upon an application for 
membership shall be by white and black balls. 
Two black balls shall be sufficient to exclude the 
applicant, and no club shall be required, under 
any circumstances, to state how it voted upon 
such application. Such election shall take place 
at the annual meeting of the League: ' Provided, 
That should any eligible club desire to join the 
League after the adjournment of the annual meet- 
ing, and before March 1 following, it may make 
application in writing to the Secretary of the 
League, who shall at once communicate such 
application, together with any facts in his posses- 
sion concerning such applicant, to the President 
of the League, who shall refer it to a special 
committee of the Board, as provided in Section 
6 ; and upon receipt by the Secretary of the 
report of said committee, he shall transmit 
such application and report to all League clubs, 
each of whom shall, within ten days, trans- 
mit one written ballot, for or against the admis- 
sion of such applicant, to the Secretary; and if 
two adverse ballots be not cast, then the Secre- 
tary shall, upon receipt of the annual dues, noti- 
fy such club of its election. 






10 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



Sec. 8. In case any League club shall forfeit 
its membership during the championship season, 
the Board of Directors shall elect a club member 
of the League Alliance to temporary member- 
ship in the League, which election shall entitle 
such temporary club member, without the pay- 
ment of League club dues, to play all the cham- 
pionship schedule games remaining unplayed by 
the retired League club, upon the same terms 
and conditions as League clubs, except that such 
games shall not count in the championship series, 
and such temporary membership shall terminate 
with the expiration of the championship season. 

SEC. 9. The umpires, managers and players 
employed by the clubs belonging to this League 
shall be considered and treated as members 
hereof to the extent of being always amenable 
to the provisions of this Constitution, and enti- 
tled to all its privileges in matters of dispute, 
grievance or discipline, as provided in this Con- 
stitution. 

SEC. 10. The clubs and players of the League 
Alliance are hereby declared to be honorary 
members of this League. 

Sec. 1 1. The membership of any League club 
shall be forfeited : 

1. By voluntary withdrawal. 

2. By disbandment. 

3. By offering, agreeing, conspiring, or at- 
tempting to lose any game of ball, or failing to 
immediately expel any player who shall be proven 
guilty of offering, agreeing, conspiring or at- 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. H 

tempting to lose any game of ball, or of being 
interested in any pool or wager thereon. 

4. By taking part in any game of ball on 
Sunday, or allowing any game of ball to be 
played upon its grounds on Sunday, or failing to 
immediately expel any person under contract with 
it who shall, at any time during the term of his 
service, take part as umpire, player, or scorer, in 
any game of ball on Sunday. 

5. By selling, or allowing to be sold, upon its 
grounds, or in any building owned or occupied 
by it, at any time during the championship sea- 
son, any spirituous, vinous, or malt-liquors. 

6. By allowing open betting, or pool selling, 
upon its grounds, or in any building owned or 
occupied by it. 

7. By employing or presenting as umpire, 
manager or player, any person disqualified or in- 
eligible under any provision of this Constitutino. 

8. By playing any game of ball with any club 
that is disqualified or ineligible under any provi- 
sion of this Constitution. 

9. By failing to present its nine at the time 
and place agreed upon to play any championship 
game, unless the failure be caused by an unavoid- 
able accident in traveling. 

10. By failing to pay to the visiting club the 
amount due such club under the provisions of 
Section 73 of this Constitution. 

11. By failing to pay its annual dues on or 
before the first day of May of each year. 



12 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



2. 

3- 
4- 
5- 



12. By failing or refusing to comply with any 
lawful requirement or order of the Board of Di- 
rectors. 

13. By willfully violating any provision of this 
Constitution, or of the Playing Rules adopted 
hereunder. 

SEC. 12. The honorary membership of any 
League Alliance club shall be forfeited : 
1. By voluntary withdrawal. 

By joining any other association of clubs. 
By disbandment. 
By failing to pay its annual dues. 
By failing to pay to the League club the 
amount due* such club under the provisions of 
Section 57 of this Constitution. 

6. ^ By any violation of any of the provisions 
of this Constitution concerning the League Alli- 
ance. 

Sec. 13. The membership of any umpire, 
manager or player of this League, or of the 
League Alliance, shall be forfeited upon the dis- 
qualification of such umpire, manager or player, 
under any of the provisions of this Constitution. 

Six. 14. To carry into effect the provisions of 
Sections 11, 12 and 13 of this Constitution, the 
facts in any case covered by such sections must be 
reported to the Secretary of the League, who 
shall at once telegraph the party charged with the 
specified offense, inquiring whether any dispute 
exists as to the facts alleged. In case the facts 
are disputed, the Board shall at once try the case- 
under such regulations as they may prescribe, 
and subnet their findings to each League club, 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION 1 . 13 

which shall transmit to the Secretary written 
ballots, "For Expulsion," or "Against Expul- 
sion ; " and if two-thirds of all League clubs vote 
" For Expulsion," the Secretary shall notify all 
League and League Alliance clubs of the forfeit- 
ure of membership of the party charged; and 
every club shall, on and after the receipt of such 
notice, govern its intercourse with such expelled 
member by the prohibitions and penalties pre- 
scribed by this Constitution. Provided (i), in all 
cases where the facts do not admit of dispute (as 
in case of non-payment of dues), or where no 
reply to the Secretary's dispatch to the party 
charged with the offense is received by him within 
twenty-four hours, or where the facts are not 
disputed, the Secretary shall forthwith issue his 
notice of forfeiture of membership without sub- 
mitting the matter to the Board or to the League. 
(2) In all cases where the League Alliance alone 
is concerned, the vote of League Alliance, instead 
League clubs, shall be obtained. 

SEC. 15. Any club, umpire, manager or 
player, having forfeited membership, shall not be 
readmitted, except by unanimous vote of the 
League. 

Sec. i 6. A list shall be kept by the Secretary 
of the names of any persons who may be declared, 
by an affirmative vote of five League clubs, at any 
regular or special meeting, to be unworthy of 
service in the League, as umpire, manager, or 
player, and any person so named shall be dis- 
qualified for employment by, or service in, any 
League club, until his name be removed from such 



14 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



list by unanimous vote of all League clubs at a 
regular or special meeting. (See paragraphs 4, 
7 and 12 of League contract.) The Secretary- 
shall immediately notify all League and League 
Alliance clubs of any name placed upon or re- 
moved from such list of disqualified persons. 



DUES. 

Section 17. Every League club shall pay to 
the Secretary of the League, on or before the 
first day of May of each year, the sum of One 
Hundred Dollars, as annual dues. 

Sec. 18. Every League Alliance club shall 
pay to the Secretary of the League, as annual 
dues for the current year, on joining the League 
Alliance, and thereafter yearly, on or before the 
first day of May, the sum of twenty-five dollars. 

OFFICERS. 

SECTION 19. At its annual meeting, the 
League shall elect a President by ballot. The 
President shall be ex-officio chairman of the 
Board of Directors. He shall preside at all the 
meetings of the League, and shall call special 
meetings of the League when he may deem it 
necessary, or when thereto requested by half of 
the clubs of the League. 

SEC. 20. The affairs of this League shall be 
conducted and controlled by five Directors, who 
shall constitute " The Board," and who shall con- 
sist of the President and four members, to be 
chosen at the annual meeting, in the following 
manner : The name of each club, except that of 






LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



15 



which the President is a member, shall be plainly 
written upon a card, in full view of the delegates 
present, by the Secretary ; the cards to be of the 
same size, shape, color and material. The cards 
shall then be placed in some suitable receptacle 
and well shaken together ; thereupon four of 
these cards shall be drawn successively, and at 
random, and one delegate from each of the four 
clubs whose names are so drawn, shall, with the 
President, compose the Board, and if any club 
whose name is thus drawn be represented by two 
delegates, such delegates shall name one of their 
number to be a memberof the Board: " Provided, 
that at any time after the adjournment of the an- 
nual League meeting, any League club represent- 
ed in the Board may substitute another represen- 
tative ; such substitution to be attested by written 
notice to the Secretary, signed by the President 
of the League club, and, upon the receipt of 
such notice by the Secretary, such substitution 
shall take effect, and the Secretary shall there- 
upon notify all League and League Alliance 
clubs. 

Sec. 21. No person shall be qualified to act 
as Director, who is not an actual member of the 
club he represents ; nor shall any club, under any 
circumstances, be represented by more than one 
person on the Board. 

Sec. 22. The Board shall have the general 
supervision and management of all the affairs and 
business of the League, and shall be individually 
answerable to the League- for the faithful dis- 
charge of their trust. 



16 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



SEC. 23. The Board shall meet annually on 

the evening of the first Tuesday in December, at 

he place where the annual meeting of the League 

is to be held, but may hold special meetings 

whenever urgent necessity may require. 

SEC. 24. The Board shall prepare a detailed 
report of all their doings, and present the same, 
in writing, to the League, at its annual meeting, 
which report shall, if accepted, be filed with the 
Secretary, together with all official papers, docu- 
ments and property which may have come into 
their possession by virtue of their office. 

Sec. 25. Any Director who shall disclose or 
publish any of the proceedings of the Board, 
except officially through the report of the Board, 
or when called upon by vote of the League, shall 
forfeit his office. 

Sec. 26. In case of a vacancy in the Board by 
reason of the death, resignation, absence, or dis- 
qualification of any Director, the club of which 
he was a member at the time he was chosen shall 
designate his successor, and at once notify the 
Secretary. But if such vacancy is caused by the 
withdrawal, disbanding or disqualification of a 
club represented on the Board, the Board may 
fill the vacancy by election in the same manner 
as provided for the election of Directors in Sec- 
tion 20. 

SEC 27. The Board shall elect a gentleman of 
intelligence, honesty and good repute, who is 
versed in base ball matters, but who is not in any 
manner connected with the press, and who is not 
a member of any professional base ball club, 






LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



17 



cither in or out of the League, to be the Secre- 
tary of the Board and of the League. 

Sec. 28. The Secretary shall be the Treasurer 
of the League, and as such shall be the custo- 
dian of all funds of the League, receive all dues, 
fees and assessments, make such payments as 
shall be ordered by the Board, or by vote of the 
League, and render annually a report of his ac- 
counts. 

Sec. 29. The Secretary shall have the cus- 
tody and care of the official records and papers 
of the League ; shall keep a true record of all 
meetings of the League and the Board, shall is- 
sue all official notices and attend to the necessary 
correspondence ; he shall prepare and furnish 
such reports as may be called for by the Board, 
and shall be entitled to such books, stationery, 
blanks and materials as the actual duties of his 
office may require. 

Sec. 30. The Secretary shall keep a record 
of all infractions of the rules and regulations of 
the League that may come to his notice, and 
shall (except in cases covered by Sections 14 
a "d 16) make a report on the same to the Presi- 
dent, who shall present it to the Board at its 
next meeting. 

S E C. 31. The Secretary shall receive such 
salary as the Board, by vote, shall determine, 
and shall be reimbursed for all traveling expenses 
actually incurred by him in the service of the 
League ; and the Board may exact from him 
such guaranties for the faithful performance of 
his duties as they may deem for the interest and 



18 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



safety of the League. At the expiration of his 
term of office, he shall account for and deliver 
up to the Board all the property and papers 
which may have come into his hands by virtue of 
his office. 



LEAGUE CLUBS, UMPIRES, MANAGERS AND 
PLAYERS. 

SECTION 32. Each club belonging to this 
League shall have the right to regulate its own 
affairs, to make its own contracts, to establish its 
own rules, and to discipline, punish, suspend or 
expel its own manager, players or other em- 
ployes, and these powers shall not be limited to 
cases of dishonest play or open insubordination, 
but shall include all questions of carelessness, 
indifference, or other conduct of the player that 
may be regarded by the club as prejudicial to its 
interests : Provided, That all club regulations 
must be made subordinate to and in conformity 
with the general regulations established by this 
League, and no club shall prescribe any rule or 
regulation. in conflict with any provision of this 
Constitution or the Playing Rules. (See, also, 
League contract.) 

Sec. 33. Every club member of this League 
shall have exclusive control of the city in which 
it is located, and of the territory surrounding 
such city, to the extent of four miles in every di- 
rection from its corporate limits, and no visiting 
League club shall, under any circumstances — not 
even with the consent of the local League club, 
until all League championship games on that 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



19 



ground shall have been finished, be allowed to 
play any club in such territory other than the 
League club therein located. 

SEC. 34. Any agreement between a club and 
a manager or player for services by the manager 
or player, and compensation therefor by the club, 
must be executed in the form of contract adopted 
by the League (see League contract), and the 
Secretary of the League shall, upon application, 
furnish each League club a suitable supply of the 
printed forms of contract adopted by the League, 
and no player not under such contract shall be 
eligible to play in a League game, except that in 
case a player shall meet with an accident, or be 
expelled by his club, any player who is not oth- 
erwise disqualified, under the provisions of this 
Constitution, may take the place of such ex- 
pelled or injured player; but such player shall not 
be eligible to play for more than five champion- 
ship games in the nine of such club, without the 
contract and notice thereof required by this Sec- 
tion and Section 35. 

Sec. 35. It shall be the duty of a club, as soon 
as it shall have entered into a contract with a 
manager or player, to transmit said contract to 
the Secretary of the League. If the Secretary shall 
find the contract to be in the form adopted by the 
League, he shall indorse upon it his certificate to 
that effect, together with the date of its receipt 
by him, and at once return it to the contracting 
club. The Secretary shall also enter upon his 
records the names of the contracting club, and 
manager or player, and immediately notify all 



20 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



other League clubs of such contract. In no 
case shall the Secretary give such certificate, 
or give notice of such contract, unless it 
comply, in all respects, with the form of contract 
adopted by the League, and no contract shall be 
regarded as valid or binding until it bears the 
Secretary's certificate as herein provided. 

SEC. 36. Whenever a club releases a manager 
or player without notice, or gives him twenty 
days' notice of release, in accordance with para- 
graphs 15 or 20 of the League contract, and 
whenever it suspends or expels a manager or 
player, that club shall at once notify the Secre- 
tary, stating, in case of release, the date when 
the same takes effect, and in case of suspension 
or expulsion, the cause thereof, and the Secre- 
tary shall at once notify all other clubs of the 
League and League Alliance. 

Sec 37. A manager or player who has been 
released from his contract, without suspension or 
expulsion, may engage with any other club, 
twenty days from the date of the reception by 
the Secretary of the notice of such release. A 
player released under paragraph 15 of the League 
contract, shall not be eligible to play in the nine 
of the club releasing him, during the said twenty 
days, but he may do so if released under para- 
graph 20 of the League contract. 

Sec. 38. A manager or player whose contract 
has become void by reason of his club's disband- 
ing, withdrawing from or losing its membership 
in the League, may immediately engage for the 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



21 



remainder of the season with any other League 
club. 

SEC. 39. No manager or player who has been 
suspended or expelled from a League club, or sus- 
pended by the League under the provisions of 
Section 16 of this Constitution, shall, at any time 
thereafter, be allowed to play with or serve any 
League club (either the one expelling him or 
any other) unless the term of suspension by the 
club has expired, or upon his appeal to the Board, 
such suspension or expulsion shall have been set 
aside, or, in any case under Section 16, his name 
shall have been removed from the list by unani- 
mous vote of the League, as provided in said 
section. 

Sec. 40. No club shall employ as umpire, 
manager, scorer, or player, any person who has 
willfully violated any provision of this Constitu- 
tion, or of the Playing Rules, or who has been 
expelled from any club belonging to this League, 
or who shall be disqualified from playing with a 
club under any provision of this Constitution. 

Sec. 41. No game of ball shall be played 
between a League club and any other club that 
has forfeited its membership in this League. No 
game of ball shall be played between a League 
club and any other club employing or presenting 
in its nine a player expelled, or under suspension, 
from the League. Nor shall any League club 
play any club that has, at any time during the 
same playing season, played a game of ball with 
any other club employing or presenting in its nine 
any player expelled or suspended from the 



22 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



League: Provided, That in case the club em- 
ploying such expelled or suspended League player 
shall discharge such player from its service, 
League clubs may thereafter play against such 
club, and against other clubs that may have 
played such club while employing such player. 

Sec. 42. Any manager or player who may 
consider himself aggrieved or injured by any act 
of his club, or of any officer, agent or employe 
thereof, shall make his complaint thereof to the 
President of the club when the club " nine " is at 
home. Any manager or player, under contract 
with a League club, who shall, without the writ- 
ten consent of such club, leave its service, or 
who shall be proven guilty of offering, agreeing, 
conspiring, or attempting to lose any game of 
ball, or of being interested in any pool or wager 
thereon, shall be at once expelled by such club. 

SEC. 43. Any manager or player, under con- 
tract with a League club, whose name shall be 
piaced upon the list of disqualified persons pro- 
vided for in Section 16 of this Constitution, 
in the manner therein provided, shall, immedi- 
ately upon receipt by such club of the Sec- 
retary's notice of such action, be discharged 
by such club from its service. (See paragraphs 
4, 7 and 12 of the League contract.) 

SEC. 44. Any person under contract with a 
League club, who shall be guilty of drunkenness, 
gambling in any form, insubordination, or of any 
dishonorable or disreputable conduct (except the 
offenses requiring expulsion, specified in Section 
42) may be suspended by such club for the re- 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



23 



maindei- of the playing season, or for the re- 
mainder of that and all of the ensuing playing 
season, at the option of such club ; and during 
the period of said suspension, such player shall 
be disqualified from playing in or against any 
League club : Provided, That the club having 
made the suspension shall not have power to re- 
scind it, or to curtail its duration. (See para- 
graph 6, League contract.) 

Sec. 45. Any person who shall be proven 
guilty of offering, agreeing, conspiring or at- 
tempting to cause any game of ball to result oth- 
erwise than on its merits under the Playing Rules, 
or who, while acting as umpire, shall willfully 
violate any provision of the Constitution, or of 
the Playing Rules adopted hereunder, shall be 
forever disqualified from acting as umpire of any 
game of ball participated in by a League club. 



THE LEAGUE ALLIANCE. 
Section 46. Clubs whose organization and 
conduct are not inconsistent with the objects of 
this League, as expressed in Section 2 of this 
Constitution, and who are also eligible under the 
following provisions, and who shall have filed 
with the- Secretary of the League a written appli- 
cation for membership, containing an engagement 
to comply with the terms of the following agree- 
ment, as published in the League Book, and with 
all other regulations of the League relating to the 
League Alliance, shall be recognized as consti- 
tuting "The League Alliance," Provided (1), 
That not more than one club shall be admitted 



24 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



to the League Alliance from any city; (2) That 
not more than two adverse votes be given on the 
application for membership. Every League and 
League Alliance club shall have one vote upon 
the application for membership, and the Secre- 
tary of the League shall obtain the vote immedi- 
ately upon receipt of the application ; (3) That 
the annual dues specified in Section 18 of this 
Constitution, be paid to the League Secretary 
on receipt of his notice of election to member- 
ship. 
Sec. 47. form of "league alliance" agreement. 

It is hereby agreed by tlte parties hereto, as follows : 

1. No club that is a party hereto shall employ or play in its 
nine any player to whose services any other club that is a party 
hereto, may be entitled by contract. 

2. Any player under contract with any club that is a patty 
hereto, who shall, without the written consent of such club, le::ve 
its service, or fail to perform his contract, or who shall be proven 
guilty of disreputable conduct, shall be at once expelled by such 
club. 

3. No club that is a party hereto shall play any game of ball 
with any base ball club whatever, that shall employ or present in 
its nine any player that shall have been expelled from any club 
that is a party hereto, for breach of contract or disreputable con- 
duct. 

4. Each club that is a party hereto shall, upon making a con- 
tract with a player, immediately notify the Secretary of the National 
League of Professional Base liall Clubs, such notice to be in writing, 
signed by the contracting club and the player, and, in the absence 
of such notice to such officer, any player shall be deemed to be free 
from contract obligation. 

5. Each club that is a party hereto shall, upon expelling a 
player from membership, or releasing him from contract, notify 
the Secretary of the National League of Professional Base Ball 
Clubs, and in the absence of such notice to such officer, such player 
shall be deemed to be a member in good standing of the club whose 
notice of contract with such player had previously been transmitted 
to such officer, until the expiration of the term of such contract. 

6. All games played by the clubs that are parties hereto, shall 
be played in accordance with the Playing Rules of the National 
League. 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



25 



7. All disputes that may arise between the clubs that are 
parties hereto, shall be submitted to the Board of Directors of the 
National League, for adjudication in the manner provided for by 
Section 49 of its Constitution, and the finding of such tribunal 
shall be final and binding upon the clubs that are parties hereto. 

8. This agreement shall go into effect and be binding upon each 
club upon receipt of the Secretary's notice of its election to mem- 
bership in the League Alliance. 

Sec. 48. The Secretary shall immediately no- 
tify all League and League Alliance clubs, upon 
receipt of any of the notices specified in the 
fourth and fifth clauses of the League Alliance 
agreement, and shall perform such other duties 
as may devolve upon him in furtherance of the 
provisions of said agreement. 

Sec. 49. The Board shall, if thereunto request- 
ed by League Alliance clubs, adjudicate disputes 
in the manner provided in Sections 59, 60, 61, 62 
and 63, so far as the provisions of such Sections 
may be applicable thereto: Provided, That all 
communications must be addressed to the Secre- 
tary of the League. 

Sec. 50. No League Club shall employ or 
play in its nine any player to whose services any 
League Alliance Club is entitled by contract evi- 
denced by written notice to the Secretary, signed 
by the contracting club and the player ; nor any 
player expelled by a League Alliance club for 
breach of contract or other disreputable conduct. 

Sec. 5 1 . No League Alliance club shall employ 
or play in its nine any player to whose services 
any League club is entitled by contract evidenced 
by written notice to the Secretary, nor any player 
expelled or under suspension from the League. 



26 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



SEC. 52. The League shall, at its annual meet- 
ing, receive and consider any communication 
from a club or clubs of the League Alliance, on 
matters affecting the interests of such club or 
clubs, and shall give a hearing to any delegation 
or delegations therefrom. And two delegates 
from each League Alliance club shall have the 
right to be present at the annual meeting of the 
League. 

Sec. 53. The Secretary shall receive and place 
on file the score of any game played between two 
League Alliance Clubs that may be forwarded to 
him, bearing the certificate of the umpire of such 
game, and stating the names of each club, the 
number of runs made by each, and number of 
innings played, and at the close of the season the 
Secretary shall prepare a tabular statement of 
such games, according to the statement so sent 
him (which statement shall be the sole evidence 
in the matter), and submit the same, with the 
statements so sent him, to the Board, who shall 
award the League Alliance championship to the 
club which shall have won the greatest number 
of such games. The Board shall make the award 
in writing, and report the same to the League at 
its annual meeting, and the League shall, there- 
upon, present such club with a suitable emblem 
of such championship. 



Sec. 54- 
any League 



No game shall be played between 
club and non-League club in any 



city in which a League Alliance club is located, 
except with such League Alliance club. 



_ 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



27 



Sec. 55- I n all games between League and 
League Alliance clubs, the visiting club shall be 
accorded the right to take, by its agents, all tick- 
ets of admission, and to have sole control of all 
gates, which shall be not more than two in 
number, and, where self-registering turnstiles are 
not used, shall not be more than two and one- 
third feet in width of passage-way, except that 
one carriage gate shall also be allowed, to be also 
under the sole control of the visiting club. 

Sec. 56. In agreements for divisions of re- 
ceipts from games between League and League 
Alliance clubs, " Gross receipts " shall mean all 
receipts from sale of admission and grand stand 
tickets, and for admission to the grounds, to 
grand stands, and to any other special privileges 
of the grounds. " Gate receipts " shall mean all 
receipts from sale of admission tickets and for 
admission to the grounds, but shall not include 
extra fees for admission to grand stands or other 
special privileges of the grounds. 

Sec. 57. The League Alliance club shall pay 
the League club for each game actually played, 
and immediately upon the termination of such 
game, the sum of one hundred dollars, or one- 
half the Gross receipts or Gate receipts, as may 
be previously agreed upon ; and the League Alli- 
ance club shall pay the League club fifty dollars 
in every case where a League club shall present 
its nine in the city or town of such League Alli- 
ance club, prepared to play at the time appointed 
for such game, and the game be prevented by 
rain, or by any cause other than the refusal by 



■■■ 



28 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 






such League club to play such game. In the 
event of the refusal or failure of any League 
Alliance club to pay the sum or sums due as 
herein stipulated, the League club shall at once 
telegraph such fact to the Secretary of the League, 
who shall forthwith notify all other League 
clubs by telegraph, and no League club shall 
thereafter play such defaulting club until the full 
amount due be paid the League club, which 
League club shall, in case "of such payment, no- 
tify the Secretary, and he the other League clubs, 
by telegraph. 

Sec. 58. No club that has forfeited its mem- 
bership in the League, or that is connected with 
any organization of clubs other than the League 
or League Alliance, or that presents in its nine 
any player expelled from the League or League 
Alliance, shall be entitled to the benefits of these 
regulations, and the Secretary shall notify all 
League and League Alliance clubs of any for- 
feiture of such benefits that may be incurred by 
the violation of any provision of these regulations. 



DISPUTES AND COMPLAINTS. 
Section 59. The Board of Directors shall be 
the sole tribunal to determine disputes between 
clubs ; the facts to be submitted, and the dispute 
adjudicated under such regulations as the Board 
shall prescribe in each case. The finding of the 
Board shall be final, and under no circumstances 
shall be reconsidered, reopened, or inquired into, 
either by the League or any subsequent Board. 



LEAGUK CONSTITUTION. 



29 



SEC. 60. The Board shall at once consider any 
complaint preferred by a club against a manager 
or player of another club for conduct in violation 
of any provision of this Constitution, or prejudi- 
cial to the good repute of the game of base ball, 
and shall have power to require the club to which 
such player may belong to discipline him, and, 
upon repetition of such offense, to expel him : 
Provided, That such complaint be preferred in 
writing, giving such particulars as may enable 
the Board to ascertain all the facts, and be trans- 
mitted to the Secretary, by whom it shall at 
once be referred to the Board. 

Sec. 61. The Board shall also be the sole tri- 
bunal for the hearing of an appeal made by any 
person who shall have been expelled or suspended 
by his club, or for an alleged breach of contract. 
The matter shall be proceeded with in the follow- 
ing manner: Such person shall, within thirty 
days after the date of the expulsion, suspension, 
or alleged breach of contract, file with the 
Secretary a written statement of his defense, 
accompanied by a request that an appeal be al- 
lowed him. The Secretary shall notify the club 
of the request for an appeal, accompanying such 
notice with a copy of the appeal, and, at the next 
annual meeting, the club, by its duly authorized 
representative, and the appellant in person, by 
attorney, or by written statement, shall appear 
before the Board with their testimony. The 
Board shall impartially hear the matter and ren- 
der their decision, which shall be final and forever 
binding on both club and player. 



I 1,1:! 



30 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 






Sec. 62. No director shall sit in the trial of a 
cause in which his club is interested. 

Sec. 63. Any expenses of trials or arbitrations 
shall be borne equally by the parties to the con- 
troversy. 

PLAYING RULES. 
SECTION 64. The League, at its first meeting, 
shall adopt a code of Playing Rules, which shall 
continue in force, subject only to such alterations 
or amendments as may be made at subsequent 
annual meetings of the League. 

CHAMPIONSHIP. 

SECTION 65. The Championship of the United 
States, established by this League, shall be con- 
tended for yearly by the clubs composing this 
League. 

Sec. 66. The championship season shall extend 
from the first day of May to (and including) the 
first day of October, and no game shall count in 
the championship series unless played during the 
championship season : Provided, That if the first 
day of May occurs on Sunday, the championship 
season shall begin April 30th ; and if the first 
day of October occurs on Sunday, the champion- 
ship season shall end October 2d. 

SEC. 67. Every game played between two 
clubs from the commencement of the champion- 
ship season to the completion of the champion- 
ship series between such clubs, shall be a game 
for the championship, and no League club shall 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



31 



lend or exchange players, to or with each other, 
for any game played during the championship 
season. 

SEC. 68. Each club shall play the following 
number of championship games (and no more) 
with every other club. If six clubs be members 
of the League on the first day of the champion- 
ship season, sixteen games ; if eight clubs, 
twelve games : provided, however, that if any- 
game be prevented by rain, or if a tie or drawn 
game be played, the visiting club shall play off 
such tie or drawn game, or game prevented by 
rain, on the first succeeding day (not counting 
Sundays, days previously agreed upon for cham- 
pionship games between said clubs, or days 
when rain renders playing impossible), within the 
dates of the same sehedule series between such 
clubs, if any remain open ; and if not, such game 
shall be played off within the dates of the next 
schedule series between such clubs, on the same 
grounds, if there be another schedule series be- 
tween such clubs due on those grounds, and if 
not, the said game may be played off, on the same 
grounds, by agreement of both clubs, at anytime 
after the conclusion of all championship series 
between such and all other League clubs, and 
before the expiration of the championship season, 
but not otherwise. 

Sec. 69. Each club shall be entitled to have 
half of the championship series of games with 
every other club played on its own grounds; and 
•n all the details of such games that do not involve 
the rights of the visiting club under the Playing 



mm 



32 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



Rules, but relate solely to such games as attract- 
ive exhibitions to the patrons of the home club, 
the visiting club shall defer to the wishes of the 
home club ; and the visiting club shall furnish to 
a person designated by the home club the batting 
order of its nine by 9 o'clock on the morning of 
the day of each game. 

Sec. 70. All championship games shall be ar- 
ranged for in writing, and so as to complete the 
championship series by the expiration of the 
championship season. Such written arrangement 
shall be made by such method as the League shall 
direct, before the beginning of the championship 
season, and shall consist of a schedule and agree- 
ment relating thereto, which agreement shall be 
signed by every League club, and the schedule 
and agreement filed with the Secretary of the 
League, and a copy thereof, bearing his certifi- 
cate as to its correctness, furnished by the Secre- 
tary to every League club. The schedule shall 
provide for an equal number of return games, 
and specify the date of each game, and the dates 
of each series of games. No date in said sched- 
ule shall subsequently be changed, except (1) 
by written agreement of two clubs, from a date 
fixed by the schedule for a game between such 
clubs, to another day within the dates of the 
same schedule series between such clubs; or (2) 
as provided in Section 68; or (3) by the written 
consent of all the League clubs. 

SEC. 71. The price of admission to champion- 
ship games shall be fifty cents for each adult per- 
son, and no money or tickets paid for admission 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



33 



shall be refunded in any case in which the game 
is prevented or interrupted by rain. 

Sec. 72. In correspondence between clubs, all 
letters and telegrams concerning umpires, dates, 
and other matters pertaining to championship 
games, to a club at home, must be addressed to 
and answered by its President, or by an officer of 
such club designated by its President to act for 
him in such matters, the Secretary of the League 
to be notified of such designation. If such commu- 
nications be made by another club when at home, 
they must be addressed by and answered to its 
President or his representative as above pro- 
vided ; and if the corresponding club be ab- 
sent from home, they must be addressed by and 
answered to its manager. 

Sec. 73. At the conclusion of each champion- 
ship game, the Home club shall deliver to 
the manager of the Visiting club (and shall 
transmit by mail to the Visiting club a du- 
plicate of same) a statement of the receipts 
of said game, and shall pay to the author- 
ized agent of such Visiting club the sum of 
fifteen (15) cents for each and every person ad- 
mitted to the grounds to witness such game, or 
a ny part thereof, or admitted to the grounds for 
a ny other purpose during or prior to such game, 
°r the hour appointed therefor, excepting only 
players of the contesting clubs and policemen in 
uniform. 

The number of persons admitted to the grounds 
shall be determined by the use of the necessary 
number of self-registering turnstiles, the keys of 



34 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



which shall be delivered to the agent of the Visit- 
ing club before the opening of the grounds for 
each game ; and said agent of the Visiting club 
shall have the right to affix a seal to the register, 
or box, of such turnstile, and the box of such 
turnstile shall not be removed uutil after the close 
of the seventh inning ; and in case a carriage 
gate is used, a ticket for each person admitted 
through such gate shall at once be delivered to 
the agent of the Visiting club. 

To entitle the Visiting club to the payment 
herein specified, it shall be sufficient for the visit- 
ing club to present its nine upon the grounds at 
the hour appointed and prepared to play the game 
in the absence of rain. 

SEC. 74. The visiting club shall pay the umpire 
of each championship game a fee of five dollars, 
and shall also pay all expenses incurred in secur- 
ing the attendance of such umpire. 

SEC. 75. No game shall be played between 
League clubs before the commencement of the 
championship series. 

SEC. 76. No game shall be played between 
any League club and any non-League club, or 
picked nine, upon the grounds of any League 
club, from the commencement to the completion 
of the championship series upon such grounds ; 
no game shall be arranged or played between any 
League and non-League clubs, or picked nines, 
for or upon any " off days " of the championship 
series, except as above provided, and upon the 
following express conditions : 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



35 



1. If a League championship game be pre- 
vented by rain or unavoidable accident on the 
day (not counting Sunday) preceding the day 
agreed upon for such non-League or picked-nine 
game, then the latter shall be declared off, so as 
to allow the League clubs to play the champion- 
ship game on that day. 

2. All such games shall be played under the 
Playing Rules of the League, with a League ball 
to be furnished by the League club. 

3. The non-League club (except League 
Alliance clubs) shall pay the League club, 
for each game actually played, and immedi- 
ately upon the termination of such game, the 
sum of one hundred dollars, or one-half the gross 
receipts of such game, in case the gross receipts 
shall exceed two hundred dollars ; and it is to be 
distinctly understood that the " gross receipts " 
include all revenue* derived from the exhibition, 
whether taken at regular or carriage gates, or for 
admission to grounds, grand stands, or to other 
special privileges of the grounds; also, that the 
visiting club shall have sole control of all gates, 
and of all entrances to grand stands, or other 
special ground privileges for which extra fees are 
charged. And the non-League club shall pay 
the League club fifty dollars in every case where 
a League club shall present its nine in the city or 
town of such non-League club, prepared to play 
at the time appointed for such game, and the 
game be prevented by rain, or by any cause other 
than the refusal by such League club to play 
such game. In the event of the refusal or failure 






— ■ 



36 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 






of any non-League club to pay the sum, or sums, 
due, as herein stipulated, the League club shall at 
once telegraph such fact to the Secretary of the 
League, who shall forthwith notify all other 
League clubs by telegraph ; and no League club 
shall thereafter play such defaulting club until 
the full amount due be paid the League club, 
which League club shall, in case of such pay- 
ment, notify the Secretary, and he the other 
League clubs, by telegraph. 

4. In any case not covered by the first con- 
dition specified in this section, a League club 
having agreed to play a non-League club upon 
the grounds of the latter, and failing to present 
its nine in the city or town of such non-League 
club, prepared to play at the time appointed for 
such game, the League club shall pay the non- 
League club the sum of fifty dollars as the pen- 
alty of such default. 

Sec. 7J . A club shall be entitled to forfeited 
games — to count in its series as games won by a 
score of nine runs to none — in cases where the 
umpire in any championship game shall award 
the game to such club on account of the violation 
by the contesting club of any playing rnle of 
this League. 

Sec. 78. Drawn, tie and postponed games 
shall not count in the series as games, but must 
be played off, if possible, as provided in Section 
68. If they cannot be played off as therein 
provided, they may subsequently be played 
off, if sufficient time exist before the close of 
the season. 






LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



37 



SEC. 79. The club which shall have won the 
greatest number of games in the championship 
series, shall be declared the champion club of the 
United States for the season in which such games 
were played. In the event that two or more 
clubs shall have won the same number of games, 
then the club which shall have lost the smallest 
number shall be declared the champion. 

The emblem of the championship shall be a 
pennant (of the national colors), to cost not less 
than one hundred dollars ($100). It shall be in- 
scribed with the motto, " Champion Base Ball 
Club of the United States," with the name of the 
club and the year in which the title was won, and 
the champion club shall be entitled to fly the 
pennant until the close of the ensuing season. 

Sec. 80. The championship shall be decided 
in the following manner : 

Within twenty-four hours after every match 
game played for the championship, the home 
club shall prepare and forward to the Secretary 
of the League a statement containing the full 
score of the game, according to the system speci- 
fied in the " Playing Rules," the date, place 
where played, and the names of the clubs and 
umpire : Provided, That no tie or drawn game 
shall be considered " a game " for any purpose, 
nor shall the score thereof be forwarded to the 
Secretary; and provided further, that in any case 
where the Secretary shall not receive the score of 
a championship game within five days after the 
playing of such game, the club whose duty it is 



38 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



to forward such score shall pay to the League the 
sum of ten dollars as the penalty of such default. 

At the close of the season, the Secretary shall 
prepare a tabular statement of the games won 
and lost by each club, according to the state- 
ments so sent him (which statements shall be the 
sole evidence in the matter), and submit the same, 
with the statements so sent him, to the Board, 
who shall make the award in writing, and report 
the same to the League at its annual meeting. 
In making the award the Board shall consider : 

i. The tabular statement of the Secretary. 

2. Forfeited games. 

3. Games participated in by clubs which have 
withdrawn, disbanded or forfeited their member- 
ship without completing their championship se- 
ries with all other League clubs ; such games 
shall be counted to the following extent : The 
Board shall ascertain the least number of cham- 
pionship games played by such club with any 
club remaining in the League, and shall, from the 
first games participated in during the champion- 
ship season, by such retired club, count in the 
series of each League club a similar number of 
games,' and all other games participated in by 
such retired club shall not be counted in the 
championship series : Provided, That if such re- 
tired club shall have failed to play at least one 
championship game with every League club, all 
games participated in by it shall be thrown out 
entirely. 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



39 



ANNUAL MEETING. 
SECTION 8i. The annual meeting of the League 
shall be held on the first Wednesday after the first 
Tuesday in December of each year, at twelve 
o'clock noon, and at such place as shall be deter- 
mined by vote at the previous annual meeting. 

SEC. 82. At such meeting each club shall be 
entitled to two representatives, and to have, in 
addition thereto, any of its officers or ex-officers 
present at such meeting; but no club shall be 
permitted to send as a representative any person 
under contract or engagement as a ball player, 
and belonging to the nine of such club in said 
capacity; they shall present a certificate from the 
President or Secretary of their club, showing their 
authority to act; but no club shall have more 
than one vote. 

SEC. 83. A representation of a majority of 
clubs shall constitute a quorum for the transac- 
tion of business, but a less number may adjourn 
from time to time until a quorum is obtained. 

SEC 84. The following shall be the order of 
business. 

1. Reading minutes of last meeting. 

2. Report of Board of Directors. 

3. Election of new members. 

4. Amendment of Constitution. 

5. Amendment of Playing Rules. 

6. Miscellaneous business. 

7. Election of Officers. 

8. Adjourment. 



40 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



AMENDMENTS. 
SECTION 85. The Constitution or Playing Rules 
of this League may be altered or amended by a two- 
thirds vote of the League at any annual meeting. 






4 



izjstidieix: 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



RULE. 

The Ground i 

The Infield 2 

The Bases 3 

The Foul Lines 4 

The Pitcher's Lines 5 

The Catcher's Lines 6 

The Captain's Lines 7 

The Players' Lines 8 

The Players' Bench 9 

The Batsman's Lines 10 

The Three Feet Lines 11 

The Lines must be Marked 12 

The Ball 13 

of what composed (1) 13 

furnished by Home Club (2) 13 

replaced if injured (3) 13 

" lost (4) 13 

The Bat 14 

FIELD RULES. 

Open Betting and Pool Selling Prohibited 15 

Sale of Liquor Prohibited 16 

No Person Allowed on Field During Game 17 

Players not to Sit with Spectators 18 

Penalty for Insulting Umpire 19 

Penalty for not Keeping Field Clear 20 

Restriction as to Addressing Audience 21 

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

Nine Players on Each Side « 

Players' Positions • 2 3 

In the Field (1) *3 



42 



INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS 



attheBat (2) 23 

Order of Batting (3) 23 

Restriction as to Occupying Catcher's Lines (4) 23 

DEFINITIONS. 

AHigh Ball 24 

A Low Ball 25 

A High or Low Ball 26 

A Fair Ball 27 

An Unfair Ball 28 

A Balk 29 

A Foul Balk 30 

A Dead Ball . . . « 31 

A Biock 32 

AFairHit 33 

A Foul Hit 34 

A Strike 35 

A Foul Strike 36 

"Play" 37 

"Time" 38 

" Game '' 39 

An Inning 40 

A Time at Bat 41 

Legal, or Legally 42 

THE GAME. 

Number of Innings 43 

Drawn Game 44 

Forfeited Game 4c 

"No Game" 46 

Substitute, when Allowed 47 

Choice of First Innings 48 

When Umpire must Call " Play " 49 

Game must Begin when " Play" is Called 49 

. When Umpire may Suspend Play 49 

" " " Terminate Game 49 

Rain, effect of, in Terminating Game (4) 43 

it ti U It (t 

• •••■ 44 

" " " " " 46 

" Definition of. 49 

" Umpire's Duty in Case of 49 

Batsman must Call for Ball he Wants 50 

What Umpire must Count and Call 50 

When Batsman is Out 51 

" " becomes Base-runner 52 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 



43 



Base-runner must Touch Bases in Order S3 

u it ' -when entitled to hold Base 53 

" " " " lake one Base 54 

" « when required to return to Base 55 

No Substitute Allowed for Base-runner 56 

When Base-runner is Out 57 

When Umpire shall, without appeal, declare player " Out" 58 

When Ball is not in Play until returned to Pitcher 59 

Block, effect of 60 

Run, when to be Scored 61 

Fines on Pitcher 62 

" " any Player 63,(4)68, 69 

Player not to Address Umpire 63 

" " " " Audience » 21 

" <• " use Improper Language (4) 68 

<• to Obey Umpire's Orders (4) 68 

THE UMPIRE. s 

Selection of Umpire 64 

Disqualification of Umpire (3) 64 

Removal of Umpire (4) 64 

Duties as to Materials of Game (1) 65 

" •' Ground Rules (1) 65 

" " Reversal of Decision (2) 65 

Changing Umpire during Game 66 

Expulsion of Umpire 67 

Umpire's Jurisdiction and Powers 68 

Umpire to give Notice of Fine (5), (6) 68 

" " " " •' Forfeited Game (6) 68 

Special Penalties 69 

Scoring Regulations 70 

CONSTRUCTION AND AMENDMENTS. 

Construction of Rules 71 

Amendment of Rules 73 



44 



PLAYING RULES 

— OF THE — 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



Professional Base Ball Clubs, 

1882. 



ADOPTED IN PURSUANCE OF SECTION 64 OF THE 
LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 

CLASS I. 

THE MATERIALS OF THE GAME. 

Rule i. The Ground must be an inclosed 
field, sufficient in size to enable each player to 
play in his position as required by these Rules. 

RULE 2. The Infield must be a space of ground 
thirty yards square. 

Rule 3. The Bases must be 

(1) Four in number, and designated as First 
Base, Second Base, Third Base and Home Base. 

(2) The Home Base must be of white marble 
or white stone, twelve inches square, so fixed in 
the ground as to be even with the surface, and so 
placed in a corner of the infield that two of its 
sides will form part of the boundaries of said in- 
field. 



PLAYING RULES. 



45 



(3) The First, Second and Third Bases must 
be canvas bags, fifteen inches square, painted 
white, and filled with some soft material, and so 
placed that the center of each shall be upon a 
separate corner of the infield, the First Base at 
the right, the Second Base opposite, and the 
Third Base at the left of the Home Base. 

(4) All the Bases must be securely fastened 
in their positions, and so placed as to be distinctly 
seen by the Umpire. 

RULE 4. The Foul Lines must be drawn in 
staight lines from the outer corner of the Home 
Base, through the center of the positions of First 
and Third Bases, to the boundaries of the Ground. 

Rule 5. The Pitcher's Lines must be straight 
lines forming the boundaries of a space of 
ground, in the Infield, six feet long by four feet 
wide, distant fifty feet from the center of the 
Home Base, and so placed that the six feet lines 
would each be two feet distant from and parallel 
with a straight line passing through the center 
of the Home and Second Bases. Each corner 
of this space must be marked by a flat iron plate 
or stone, six inches square, fixed in the ground, 
even with the surface. 

RULE 6. The Catcher's Lines must be drawn 
from the outer corner of the Home Base, in 
continuation of the Foul Lines, straight to the 
limits of the Ground back of the Home Base. 

RULE 7. The Captain's Lines must be drawn 
from the Catcher's Lines to the Limits of the 
Ground, fifteen feet from and parallel with the 
Foul Lines. 



46 



PLAYING RULES. 



RULE 8. The Players' Lines must be drawn 
from the Catcher's Lines to the limits of the 
Ground, fifty feet from and parallel with the Foul 
Lines. 

RULE 9. The Players' Bench must be fur- 
nished by the Home Club, and placed upon a por- 
tion of the Ground outside the Players' Lines. It 
must be twelve feet in length and immovably 
fastened to the ground. At each end of such 
bench must be immovably fixed a bat-rack, with 
fixtures for holding twenty bats; one such rack 
must be designated for the exclusive use of the 
Visiting Club, and the other for the exclusive use 
of the Home Club. 

Rule 10. The Batsman's Lines must be 
straight lines forming the boundaries of a space 
on the right, and of a similar space on the left of 
the Home Base, six feet long by three feet wide, 
extending three feet in front of and three feet 
behind the center of the Home Base, and with its 
nearest line distant one foot from the Home Base. 

RULE ii. The Three Feet Lines must be 
drawn as follows: From a point on the Foul 
Line from Home Base to First Base, and equally 
distant from such bases, shall be drawn a line on 
Foul Ground, at a right angle to said Foul Line, 
and to a point three feet distant from it ; thence 
running parallel with said Foul Line, to a point 
three feet distant from the center of the First 
Base ; thence in a straight line to the center of 
the First Base, and thence upon the Foul Line to 
the point of beginning. 



PLAYING RULES. 



47 



RULE 12. The lines designated in Rules 4, 5, 
6, 7, 8, 10 and 11 must be marked with chalk or 
other suitable material, so as to be distinctly seen 
by the Umpire. They must all be so, marked 
their entire length, except the Captain's and 
Players' Lines, which must be so marked for a 
distance of at least thirty-five yards from the 
Catcher's Lines. 



Rule 13. The Ball 

(1) Must not weigh less than five nor more 
than five and one-quarter ounces avoirdupois, 
and measure not less than nine nor more than 
nine and one-quarter inches in circumference. 
It must be composed of woolen yarn, and con- 
tain not more than one ounce of vulcanized rub- 
ber in mould form, and be covered with leather. 
It must be furnished by the Secretary of the 
League, whose seal shall be final evidence of the 
legality of the ball. 

(2) In all games the ball or balls played with 
shall be furnished by the Home Club, and be- 
come the property of the winning club. 

(3) Should the ball become out of shape, or 
cut or ripped so as to expose the yarn, or in any 
way so injured as to be unfit for fair use in the 
opinion of the Umpire, on being appealed to by 
either Captain, a new ball shall be called for by 
the Umpire at the end of an even innings. 

(4) '^Should the ball be lost during the game, 
the Umpire shall, at the expiration of five min- 
utes, call for a new ball. 



48 



PLAYING RULES. 



Rule 14. The Bat 

( 1 ) Must be made wholly of wood. 

(2) It must be round, must not exceed two 
and one-half inches in diameter in the thickest 
part, and must not exceed forty-two inches in 
length. 

CLASS II. 
FIELD RULES. 

RULE 15. No Club shall allow open betting or 
pool selling upon its grounds, nor in any building 
owned or occupied by it. 

Rule 16. No Club shall sell or allow to be 
sold upon its grounds, nor in any building owned 
or occupied by it, any spirituous, vinous or malt 
liquors. 

Rule 17. No person shall be allowed upon 
any part of the field during the progress of the 
game, in addition to the nine players on each side 
and the umpire, except such officers of the law as 
may be present in uniform to preserve the peace. 

RULE 18. Players in uniform shall not be 
permitted to seat themselves among the specta- 
tors. 

Rule 19. The umpire is the sole judge of 
play, and is entitled to the respect of the specta- 
tors, and any person hissing or hooting at, or 
offering any insult or indignity to him, must be 
promptly ejected from the grounds. 

RULE 20. Every Club shall furnish sufficient 
police force upon its own grounds to preserve 
order, and in the event of a crowd entering the 



LAYING RULES. 



49 



field during the progress of a game, and inter- 
fering with the play in any manner, the Visiting 
Club may refuse to play further until the field be 
cleared ; and if the ground be not cleared within 
fifteen minutes thereafter, the Visiting Club may 
claim, and shall be entitled to, the game by a 
score of nine runs to none (no matter what num- 
ber of innings have been played). 

RULE 21. ■ No Manager, Captain or Player 
shall address the audience during the progress of 
a game, except in case of necessary explanation. 



CLASS III. 
THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 
RULE 22. The Players of each club, in a 
match game, shall be nine in number, one of 
whom shall be the Captain. 

Rule 23. The Players' Positions shall be 

(1) When in the field (designated "Field- 
ers " in these Rules) such as may be assigned 
them by their Captain, except that the Pitcher 
must take his position within the Pitcher's Lines, 
as defined in Rule 5. 

(2) When their side goes to the bat they 
must immediately seat themselves upon the Play- 
ers' Bench, and remain there until the side is put 
out, except when batsman or base-runner. All 
bats not in use must be kept in the bat racks, 
and the two players next succeeding the Bats- 
man, in the order in which they are named on 
the Score, must be ready with bat in hand to 
promptly take position as batsman : Provided , 



50 



PLAYING RULES. 



that the Captain, and one assistant only, may 
occupy the space between the Players' Lines and 
the Captain's Lines, to coach Base-Runners. 

(3) The Batsmen must take their positions 
within the Batsman's Lines, as denned in Rule 10, 
in the order in which they are named on the 
Score, which must contain the batting order of 
both nines and must be followed, except in case 
of disability of a player, in which case the substi- 
tute must take the place of the disabled player in 
the batting order. 

(4) No player of the side at bat, except when 
Batsman, shall occupy any portion of the space 
within the Catcher's Lines as defined in Rule 6. 



CLASS IV. 
DEFINITIONS. 

RULE 24. A High Ball is a ball legally de- 
livered by the Pitcher, over the Home Base, 
higher than the belt of the Batsman, but not 
higher than his shoulder. 

RULE 25. A Low Ball is a ball legally deliv- 
ered by the Pitcher, over the Home Base, not 
higher than the Batsman's belt, nor lower than 
his knee. 

Rule 26. A High or Low Ball is a ball 
legally delivered by the Pitcher, over the Home 
Base, not higher than the Batsman's shoulder, nor 
lower than his knee. 

JRULE 27. A Fair Ball is a ball delivered 
by the Pitcher, while wholly within the lines 
of his position and facing the Batsman, with 



PLAYING RULES. 



51 



his arm swinging nearly perpendicular by his side 
and his hand passing below his waist, and the 
ball passing over the Home Base at the height 
called for by the Batsman. 

RULE 28. An Unfair Ball is a ball delivered 
by the Pitcher as in Rule 27, except that the ball 
does not pass over the Home Base, or does not 
pass over the Home Base at the height called for 
by the Batsman. 

Rule 29. A Balk is 

(1) A motion made by the Pitcher to deliver 
the ball to the bat without delivering it, except 
the ball be accidentally dropped; or, 

(2) The ball be held by the Pitcher so long 
as to delay the game unnecessarily; or, 

(3) Delivered to the bat by the Pitcher when 
any part of his person is upon ground outside the 
lines of his position. 

RULE 30. A Foul Balk is a ball delivered to 
the bat by the Pitcher by an overhand throw, or 
any swing of the arm or hand other than that 
prescribed in Rule 27. 

Rule 31. A Dead Ball is a ball delivered to 
the bat by the Pitcher, that touches the Batsman's 
bat, without being struck at, or any part of the 
Batsman's person while standing in his position, 
without being struck at, or any part of the Um- 
pire's person, without first passing the Catcher. 

RULE 32. A Block is a batted or thrown ball 
that is stopped or handled by any person not en- 
gaged in the game. 



52 



PLAYING RULES. 



RULE 33. A Fair Hit is a ball batted by the 
Batsman, standing in his position, that first 
touches the ground, the First Base, the Third 
Base/ the person of a player, or any other object, 
in front of or on either of the Foul Lines, or 
(Exception) batted directly to the ground by the 
Batsman, standing in his position, that (whether 
it first touches Foul or Fair Ground) bounds or 
rolls within the Foul Lines between Home and 
First, or Home and Third Bases, without first 
touching the person of a player. 

RULE 34. A Foul Hit is a ball batted by the 
Batsman, standing in his position, that first 
touches the ground, the person of a player, or 
any other object, behind either of the Foul Lines, 
or that strikes the person of such Batsman, 
while standing in his position, or (Exception) 
batted directly to the ground by the Batsman, 
standing in his position, that (whether it first 
touches Foul or Fair Ground) bounds or rolls 
outside the Foul Lines, between Home and First, 
or Home and Third Bases, without first touching 
the person of a player. 



Rule 35. A Strike is 

(1) A ball struck at by the Batsman without 
it touching his bat; or, 

(2) A ball legally delivered by the Pitcher at 
the height called for by the Batsman, and over 
the Home Base, but not struck at by the Bats- 
man. 



PLAYING RULES. 



53 



RULE 36. A Foul Strike is a ball batted by 
the Batsman when any part of his person is upon 
ground outside the lines of the Batsman's posi- 
tion. 

RULE 37. Play is the order of the Umpire to 
begin the game, or to resume play after its sus- 
pension. 

RULE 38. Time is the order of the Umpire to 
suspend play. Such suspension must not extend 
beyond the day of the game. 

Rule 39. Game is the announcement by the 
Umpire that the game is terminated. 

Rule 40. An Inning is the turn at bat of the 
nine players representing a Club in a game, and 
is completed when three of such players have 
been put out as provided in these Rules. 

Rule 41. A time at bat is the term at bat of 
a batsman. It begins when he takes his posi- 
tion, and continues until he is put out, or be- 
comes a base runner. 

Rule 42. Legal, or Legally, signifies as re- 
quired by these rules. 



CLASS V. 
THE GAME. 
RULE 43. A Game shall consist of nine inn- 
ings to each contesting nine, except that: 

(1) "If the side first at bat scores less runs in 
nine innings than the other side has scored 
eight innings, the game shall then terminate. 



in 



54 



PLAYING RULES. 



^2) If the side last at bat in the ninth innings 
scores the winning run before the third man is 
out, the game shall then terminate. 

(3) If the score be a tie at the end of nine 
innings to each side, play shall only be continued 
until the side first at bat shall have scored one or 
more runs than the other side, in an equal num- 
ber of innings; or until the other side shall score 
one more run than the side first at bat 

(4) If the Umpire calls " Game " on account 
of darkness or rain at any time after five innings 
have been completed by both sides, the score 
shall be that of the last equal innings played, un- 
less the side second at bat shall have scored one 
or more runs than the side first at bat, in which 
case the score of the game shall be the total num- 
ber of runs made. 

RULE 44. A Dratvn Game shall be declared 
by the Umpire when he terminates a game, on 
account of darkness or rain, after five equal inn- 
ings have been played, if the score at the time is 
equal on the last even innings played ; but {Ex- 
ception) if the side that went second to bat is then 
at the bat, and has scored the same number of 
runs as the other side, the Umpire shall declare 
the game drawn, without regard to the score of 
the last equal innings. 

RULE 45. A Forfeited Game shall be declared 
by the Umpire, in favor of the Club not in fault, 
in the following cases: 

(1) If the nine of a club fail to appear upon 
the Field, or, being upon the Field, fail to begin 



PLAYING RULES. 



55 



the game, within five minutes after the Umpire 
has called " Play" at the hour appointed for the 
beginning of the game. 

(2) If, after the game has begun, one side re- 
fuses or fails to continue playing, unless such 
game has been suspended or terminated by the 
Umpire. 

(3) If, after play has been suspended by the 
Umpire, one side fails to resume playing within 
five minutes after the Umpire has called " Play." 

(4) If the Umpire calls three Foul Balks in 
one inning, and has warned the pitcher of the 
penalty after the second Foul Balk, and before 
the third is called. 

(5) If, in the opinion of the Umpire, any one 
of these Rules is willfully violated. 

RULE 46. " No Game" shall be declared by 
the Umpire if he shall terminate play, on account 
of rain or darkness, before five innings on each 
side are completed. 

RULE 47. A Substitute shall not be allowed 
to take the place of any player in a game, unless 
such player be disabled in the game then being 
played, by reason of illness or injury. 

RULE 48. The Choice of First Innings shall 
be determined by the two Captains. 

Rule 49. The Umpire must call " Play " at 
the hour appointed for beginning a game. The 
game must begin when the Umpire calls " Play. 
When he calls " Time," play shall be suspended 
until he calls " Play " again, and during the inter- 
im no player shall be put out, base be run, or run 






56 



PLAYING RULES. 



be scored. The Umpire shall suspend play only 
ior an accident to himself or a player ; (but in case 
of accident to a Fielder, Time shall not be called 
until the ball be returned to and held by the 
Pitcher, standing in his position) ; or in case 
rain falls so heavily that the spectators are com- 
pelled, by the severity of the storm, to seek shel- 
ter, in which case he shall note the time of sus- 
pension, and, should such rain continue to fall 
thirty minutes thereafter, he shall terminate the 
game. The Umpire shall also declare every " Dead 
Ball," "Block," "Foul Hit," "Foul Strike," 
" Balk "and " Foul Balk," and after declaring the 
second " Foul Balk " in one inning, shall warn the 
Pitcher of the penalty prescribed by Rule 45 (4). 

RULE 50. The Batsman, on taking his posi- 
tion, mustcall fora" HighBall,"a" Low Ball, "or 
a " High or Low Ball," and the Umpire shall no- 
tify the Pitcher to deliver the ball as required ; 
such call shall not be changed after the first ball 
delivered. The Umpire shall count and call ev- 
ery " U" f air Ball " delivered by the Pitcher, and 
every ' : Joul Balk " and " Dead Ball," if also an 
" Unfair Ball, "as a" Ball; "and he shall also count 
and call every " Strike. " Neither a " Ball " nor a 
" Strike " shall be called counted until the ball has 
passed the Home Base. 

RULE 5 1 . The Batsman is out 

(1) If he fails to take his position at the bat 
in his order of batting, unless the error be discov- 
ered and the proper Batsman takes his position 
before a fair hit has been made. 



PLAYING RULES. 



57 



(2) If he fails to take his position within one 
minute after the Umpire has called for the Bats- 
man. 

(3) If he makes a Foul Hit, and the ball be 
momentarily held by a fielder before touching the 
ground, or after touching the ground but once, 
provided it be not caught in a fielder's hat or cap, 
or touch some object other than the fielder be- 
fore touching the ground, or before being caught. 

(4) If he makes a Foul Strike. 

(5) If he plainly attempts to hinder the 
Catcher from catching the ball, evidently without 
effort to make a fair hit. 

RULE 52. The Batsman becomes a Base Run- 
ner 

(1) Instantly after he makes a Fair Hit. 

(2) Instantly after seven Balls have been 
called by the Umpire. 

(3) Instantly after three Strikes have been 
declared by the Umpire. 

Rule 53. The Base-Runner must touch each 
Base in regular order, viz. : First, Second, Third 
and Home Bases, and when obliged to return, 
must do so on the run, and must retouch the 
base or bases in reverse order. He shall only be 
considered as holding a base after touching it, 
and shall then be entitled to hold such base until 
he has legally touched the next base in order, or 
has been legally forced to vacate it for a succeed- 
ing Base-Runner. 

RULE 54. The Base-Runner shall be entitled, 
without being put out, to take one Base, provided 
he do so on the run, in the following cases: 



58 



PLAYING RULES. 



(i) If, while he was Batsman, the Umpire 
called seven Balls. 

(2) If the Umpire awards a succeeding Bats- 
man a base on seven balls, and the Base-Runner 
is thereby forced to vacate the base held by him. 

(3) If the Umpire calls a Balk. 

(4) If a ball delivered by the Pitcher pass the 
Catcher and touch any fence or building within 
ninety feet of the Home Base. 

(S-) If he be prevented from making a base 
by the obstruction of an adversary. 

(6) If a Fielder stop or catch a batted ball 
with his hat or any part of his dress. 

Rule 55. The Base Runner shall return to 
Ins Base, and shall be entitled to so return with- 
out being put out, provided he do so on the run. 

(1) If the Umpire declares a Foul Hit, and the 
ball be not legally caught by a Fielder before 
touching the ground, or any object other than a 
Fielder. 

(2) If the Umpire declares a Foul Strike. 

(3) If the Umpire declares a Dead Ball, un- 
less it be also the seventh Unfair Ball, and he be 
thereby forced to take the next base, as provided 
in Rule 54 (2). 

Rule 56. The Base Runner shall not have a 
substitute run for him. 

RULE 57. The Base Runner is out: 
(1) If, after three Strikes have been declared 
against him while Batsman, and the Catcher fails 
to catch the third-strike ball, he plainly attempts 
to hinder the Catcher from fielding the ball. 



PLAYING RULES. 



59 



(2) If, having made a Fair Hit while Batsman, 
such fair-hit ball be momentarily held by a Fielder, 
before touching the ground or any object other 
than a Fielder: Provided, it be not caught in the 
Fielder's hat or cap. 

(3) If, when the Umpire has declared three 
Strikes on him while Batsman, the third-strike ball 
be momentarily held by a Fielder before touching 
the ground : Provided, it be not caught in a 
Fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object other 
than a Fielder before being caught. 

(4) If, after three Strikes or a Fair Hit, he be 
touched with the ball in the hand of a Fielder 
before such Base-Runner touches First Base. 

(5) If, after three Strikes or a Fair Hit, the 
ball be securely held by a Fielder, while touching 
First Base with any part of his person, before 
such Base Runner touches First Base. 

(6) If, immediately after three strikes, seven 
balls, or a fair hit, he fails to run to First Base. 

(7) If, in running the last half of the distanc: 
from Home Base to First Base, he runs outside 
the Three-Feet Lines, as defined in Rule 1 1 , except 
that he must do so if necessary to avoid a Fielder 
attempting to field a batted ball, and in such case 
shall not be declared out. 

(8) If, in running from First to Second Base, 
from Second to Third Base, or from Third to Home 
Base, he runs more than three feet from a direct 
line between such bases to avoid being touched 
by the ball in the hands of a Fielder; but in case 
a Fielder be occupying the Base-Runner's proper 



60 



PLAYING RULES. 



path, attempting to field a batted ball, then the 
Base-Runner shall run out of the path and behind 
said Fielder, and shall not be declared out for so 
doing. 

(9) If he fails to avoid a Fielder attempting 
to field a batted ball, in the manner prescribed in 
(7) and (8) of this Rule, or if he, in any way, ob- 
structs a Fielder attempting to field a batted ball: 
Provided, that if two or more Fielders attempt to 
field a batted ball, and the Base-Runner comes in 
contact with one or more of them, the Umpire 
shall determine which Fielder is entitled to the 
benefit of this Rule, and shall not decide the Base- 
Runner out for coming in contact with any other 
Fielder. 

(10) If, at any time while the ball is in play, 
he be touched by the ball in the hand of a Fielder, 
unless some part of his person is touching a base 
he is entitled to occupy, provided the ball be 
held by the Fielder after touching him; but {ex- 
ception as to First Base) in running to Frst Base 
he may overrun said base without being put out 
for being off said base, after first touching it, 
provided he returns at once and retouches the 
base, after which he may be put out as at any 
other base. If, in overrunning First Base, he also 
attempts to run to Second Base, he shall forfeit 
such exemption from being put out. 

(11) If, when a Fair or Foul Hit ball is legally 
caught by a Fielder before it touches the ground, 
such ball is legally held by a Fielder on the base 
occupied by the Base-Runner when such ball was 
struck (or the Base-Runner be touched with the 



MP 



PLAYING RULES. 



61 



ball in the hand of a Fielder), before he retouches 
said base after such Fair or Foul Hit ball was so 
caught: Provided that the Base-Runner shall not 
be out in such case, if, after the ball was legally 
caught as above, it be delivered to the bat by the 
Pitcher before the Fielder holds it on the said 
base or touches the Base-Runner with it. 

(12) If, when a Batsman becomes a Base - 
Runner [except as provided in Rule 34), the 
First Base, or the First and Second Bases, or the 
First, Second and Third Bases, be occupied, any 
Base-Runner so occupying a base shall cease to 
be entitled to hold it, until any following Base- 
Runner is put out, and may be put out at 
the next base or by being touched by the ball in 
the hands of a Fielder in the same manner as in 
running to First Base, at any time before any 
following Base-Runner is put out. 

(13) If a Fair Hit ball strike him, he shall 
be declared out, and in such case no base shall 
be run unless forced, and no run be scored. 

(14) If, when running to a base or forced to 
return to a base, he fail to touch the intervening 
base or bases, if any, in the order prescribed in 
Rule 53, he may be put out at the base he fails to 
touch, or by being touched by the ball in the hand 
of a Fielder, in the same manner as in running 
to First Base: Provided, That he shall not be 
declared out unless the Captain of the fielding 
side claim such decision before the ball is deliv- 
ered to the bat by the Pitcher. 



62 



PLAYING RULES. 



(15) If, when the Umpire calls " Play," after 
any suspension of a game, he fails to return to 
and touch the base he occupied when " Time " 
was called, before touching the next base. 

RULE 58. The Umpire shall declare the Bats- 
man or Base-Runner out, without waiting for an 
appeal for such decision, in all cases where such 
player is put out in accordance with these rules, 
except as provided in Rule 57, (11,) (14) and 
(IS-) 

Rule 59. In case of a Foul Strike, Foul Hit 
not legally caught flying, Dead Ball, or Base- 
Runner put out for being struck by a fair-hit ball, 
the ball shall not be considered in play until it is 
held by the Pitcher standing in his position. 

RULE 60. Whenever a Block occurs, the Um- 
pire shall declare it, and Base-Runners may run 
the bases without being put out, until after the 
ball has been returned to and held by the Pitcher 
standing in his position. 

Rule 61 . One Run shall be scored every time 
a Base-Runner, after having legally touched the 
first three bases, shall touch the Home Base be- 
fore three men are put out. If the third man is 
forced out, or is put out before reaching First 
Base, a run shall not be scored. . 

Rule 62. If the Pitcher causes the ball to 
strike the Batsman, and the Umpire be satisfied 
that he does it intentionally, he shall fine the 
Pitcher therefor in a sum not less than Ten Dol- 
lars, nor more than Fifty Dollars. (See League 
contract, paragraph 11.) 



PLAYING RULES. 



63 



RULE 63. No Player except the Captain cu- 
ius assistant shall address the Umpire concerning 
any point of play, and any violation of this Rule 
shall subject the offender to a fine by the Um- 
pire. 

CLASS VI. 
THE UMPIRE. 
RULE 64. The Umpire shall be selected as 
fellows : 

(1) Two clubs may, by mutual agreement, 
select any man to umpire any game or games, 
provided that such agreement be in writing, and 
the man so selected agrees not less than seven 
days before such game, or the firstof such games, 
to act as such Umpire. 

(2) A staff of League Umpires shall be se- 
lected in the following manner : Prior to April 
1st of each year, each club shall send to the Sec- 
retary the names of any persons of good repute 
and considered competent to act as Umpires. A 
list of all persons so nominated shall be prepared 
by the Secretary, and submitted to each club, 
which shall then select therefrom a number equal 
to three times the number of clubs then in the 
League, and shall transmit a list thereof to the 
Secretary, and the required number having the 
greatest number of approvals shall constitute the 
staff of League Umpires. 

(3) In case any League Umpire shall enter 
the service of a League Club as Manager or 
Player, or absent himself (except in performing 



64 



PLAYING RULES. 



the duties of League Umpire) from the place des- 
ignated on the Secretary's record as his address, 
or find that he will be unable, for a definite pe- 
riod, to perform the duties of a League Umpire, 
he shall immediately notify the Secretary of the 
period of such service, absence or inability (and 
the Secretary shall notify all League Clubs), and, 
during such period, he shall not be eligible to 
serve as League Umpire, nor be nominated to 
umpire any championship game. 

(4) Any Umpire shall be removed who shall 
be objected to in writing by two League Clubs, 
after the commencement of the championship 
season, and, in the event of the declination, res- 
ignation or expulsion of any League Umpire, the 
Secretary shall nominate, to all League Clubs, a 
man to replace him, and, unless he receive, by 
letter or telegram, the adverse vote of two League 
Clubs on such nomination within five days there- 
after, he shall notify all League Clubs, and the 
person so nominated, of his election as League 
Umpire. 

(5) In the absence of the agreement provided 
for in (1) of this Rule, the Visiting Club shall, 
by its President (or officer designated by him), 
if the club be at home, and by its Manager, if 
the club be absent from home, not less than five 
days before any Championship Game, submit by 
telegraph to the President (or officer designated 
by him) of the Home Club the names of seven 
League Umpires, none of whom shall reside in 
the city of the Visiting Club. The Home Club 
shall then be charged with the duty of producing 



PLAYING RULES. 



65 



one of the seven so named upon the grounds in 
season for the game. 

(6) In case the Visiting Club shall have failed 
to furnish the seven names as provided in (5), 
the Home Club shall select a?i Umpire for such 
game ; and in case the Visiting Club shall have 
furnished the seven names, as provided in (5), 
and the Home Club fails to produce one of the 
Umpires so named, within fifteen minutes before 
the hour appointed for the game, the Visiting 
Club shall select the Umpire. 

Rule 65. The Umpire's Duties, in addition 
to those specified in the preceding Rules, are : 

(1) Before the commencement of a Match 
Game, the Umpire shall see that the rules gov- 
erning all the materials of the game are strictly 
observed. He shall ask the Captain of the Home 
Club whether there are any special ground rules 
to be enforced, and, if there are, he shall see that 
they are duly enforced, provided they do not 
conflict with any of these Rules. He shall also 
ascertain whether the fence in the rear of the 
Catcher's position is distant ninety feet from the 
Home Base. 

(2) The Umpire shall not reverse his decision 
on any point of play upon the testimony of any 
player engaged in the game or upon the testi- 
mony of any bystander. 

RULE 66. The Umpire shall not be changed 
during the progress of a match game, except for 
reason of illness or injury, or by the consent of 
the Captains of the two contesting Nines. 



66 



PLAYING RULES. 



RULE 67. Any League Umpire who shall be 
convicted o{ selling, or offering to sell, a game of 
which he is Umpire, shall thereupon be removed 
from his official capacity and placed under the 
same disabilities inflicted on expelled players by 
the Constitution of the League. (See, also, Con- 
stitution, Section 45.) 

RULE 68. The Umpire's Jurisdictions and 
Powers, in addition to those specified in the pre- 
ceding Rules, are : 

(1) The gentleman selected to fill the posi- 
tion of Umpire must keep constantly in mind the 
fact that upon his sound discretion and prompt- 
ness in conducting the game, compelling players 
to observe the spirit as well as the letter of the 
Rules, and enforcing each and every one of the 
Rules, largely depends the merit of the game as 
an exhibition, and the satisfaction of spectators 
therewith. He must make his decisions distinct 
and clear, remembering that every spectator is 
anxious to hear such decision. He must keep 
the contesting nines playing constantly from the 
commencement of the game to its termination, 
allowing such delays only as are rendered un- 
avoidable by accident, injury or rain. He must, 
until the completion of the game, require the 
players of each side to promptly take their posi- 
tions in the field as soon as the third hand is put 
out, and must require the first striker of the op- 
posite side to be in his position at the bat as 
soon as the fielders are in their places. 

(2) 'The players of the side " at bat " must 
occupy the portion of the field allotted them, 



PLAYING RULES. 



67 



subject to the condition that they must speedily 
vacate any portion thereof that may be in the 
way of the ball, or any fielder attempting to 
catch or field it. The triangular space behind 
the Home Base is reserved for the exclusive use 
of the Umpire, Catcher and Batsman, and the 
Umpire must prohibit any player of the side " at 
bat " from crossing the same at any time while 
the ball is in the hands of the Pitcher or Catcher, 
or is passing between them, while standing in 
their positions. 

(3) Section 9 of the League Constitution 
makes the League Umpire a member of the 
League. During the progress of a game he 
is the sole representative of the League, to see 
that the game is played and determined solely on 
its merits, and these Rules invest him with am- 
ple powers to accomplish this purpose. In the 
performance of his duties he must remember that 
his sole allegiance is due to the League, and that 
the circumstance of his fees and expenses being 
paid by the visiting club places him under no ob- 
ligation whatever to such club. Such expenses 
are equally borne by all League Clubs, taking 
the season as a whole ; hence the visiting club 
merely acts as Paymaster of the League sO far 
as the Umpire is concerned. 

(4) The Umpire is master of the Field from the 
commencement to the termination of the game, 
and must compel the players to observe the pro- 
visions of all the Playing Rules, and he is hereby 
invested with authority to order any Player to 
do or omit to do any act, as he may deem it 



68 



PLAYING RULES. 



necessary to give force and effect to any and all 
of such provisions, and power to inflict upon any 
player disobeying any such order a fine of not 
less than five nor more than fifty dollars for each 
offense, and to impose a similar fine upon any 
player who shall use abusive, threatening or im- 
proper language to the Umpire, audience, or 
other player, and when the Umpire shall have so 
punished the player, he shall not have the power 
to revoke or remit the penalty so inflicted. (See 
League Contract, paragraph 11.) 

(5) The Umpire shall, at once, notify the Cap- 
tain of the offending player's side of the infliction 
of any fine herein provided for, and the club to 
which such player belongs shall, upon receipt of 
a notice of said fine from the Secretary of the 
League, within ten days transmit the amount of 
such fine to the Secretary of the League. 

(6) In case the Umpire imposes a fine on a 
player, or declares a game forfeited, he shall 
transmit a written notice thereof to the Secretary 
of the League within twenty-four hours there- 
after; and if he shall fail to do so, he shall forfeit 
his position as League Umpire, and shall forever 
thereafter be ineligible to umpire any League 
game. 

Rule 69. For the special benefit of the pat- 
rons of the Game, and because the offenses speci- 
fied are under his immediate jurisdiction, and not 
subject to appeal by players, the attention of the 
Umpire is particularly directed to possible viola- 
tions of the purpose and spirit of the Rules, of 
the following character : 



PLAYING RULES. 



69 



1. Laziness or loafing of players in taking 
their places in the field, or those allotted them 
by the Rules when their side is at bat, and espe- 
cially any failure to keep the bats in the racks 
provided for them ; to be ready (two men) to 
take position as Batsman, and to remain upon the 
Players' Bench except when otherwise required 
by the Rules. 

2. Any attempt by players of the side at bat, 
by calling to a fielder other than the one desig- 
nated by his Captain, to field a ball, or by any 
other equally disreputable means seeking to dis- 
concert a fielder. 

3. Indecent or improper language addressed 
by a player to the audience, the Umpire, or any 
player. 

In any of these cases the Umpire should 
promptly fine the offending player. 

4. The Rules make a marked distinction be- 
tween hindrance of an adversary in fielding a 
batted or a thrown ball. This has been done to 
rid the game of the childish excuses and claims 
formerly made by a Fielder failing to hold a ball 
to put out a Base-Runner, but there may be 
cases of a Base-Runner so flagrantly violating 
the spirit of the Rules and of the Game in ob- 
structing a Fielder from fielding a thrown ball, 
that it would become the duty of the Umpire not 
only to declare the Base-Runner " out " (and to 
compel any succeeding Base-Runners to hold their 
bases), but also to impose a heavy fine upon him. 
For example: If the Base-Runner plainly strike 
the ball while passing him, to prevent its being 



70 



PLAYING RULES 



caught by a Fielder ; if he hold a Fielder's arms 
so as to disable him from catching the ball, or if 
he knock the Fielder down with his fist for the 
same purpose. 

5. In the case of a " Block", if the person not 
engaged in the game should retain possession of 
the ball, or throw or kick it beyond the reach of 
the Fielders, the Umpire should call "Time," 
and require each Base-runner to stop at the last 
base touched by him, until the ball be returned 
to the Pitcher, standing in his position. 

6. The Umpire must call "Play " at the exact 
time advertised for beginning a game, and any 
player not then ready to take the position allotted 
him must be promptly fined by the Umpire. 

7. The Umpire is only allowed, by the Rules, 
to call " Time " in case of an accident to himself 
or a player, or in case of rain, as denned by the 
Rules. The practice of players suspending the 
game to discuss or contest a decision with the 
Umpire, is a gross violation of the Rules, and the 
Umpire should promptly fine any player who in- 
terrupts the game in this manner. 



CLASS VII 
SCORING. 
RULE 70. In Order to Promote Uniformity in 
Scoring Championship Games, the following in- 
structions, suggestions and definitions are made 
for the benefit of scorers of League clubs, and 
they are required to make the scores mentioned 
in Section 80 of the League Constitution in ac- 
cordance therewith. 



PLAYING RULES. 



71 



Batting. 

(i) The first item in the tabulated score, after 
the player's name and position, shall be the num- 
ber of times he has been at bat during the game. 
Any time or times where the player has been 
sent to base on called balls shall not be included 
in this column. 

(2) In the second column should be set down 
the runs made by each player. 

(3) In the third column should be placed the 
first base hits made by each player. A base hit 
should be scored in the following cases : 

When the ball from the bat strikes the ground 
between the foul lines, and out of reach of the 
fielders. 

When a hit is partially or wholly stopped by a 
fielder in motion, but such player cannot recover 
himself in time to handle the ball before the 
striker reaches First Base. 

When the ball is hit so sharply to an infielder 
that he cannot handle it in time to put out a man. 
In case of doubt over this class of hits, score a 
base hit and exempt fielder from the charge of 
an error. 

When a ball is hit so slowly toward a fielder 
that he cannot handle it in time to put out a man. 

(4) In the fourth column should be placed to 
the credit of each player the total bases made by 
him off his hits. 



72 



PLAYING RULES. 



Fielding. 

(5) The number of opponents put out by 
each player shall be set down in the fifth column. 
Where a striker is given out by the Umpire for a 
foul strike, or because he struck out of his turn 
the put-out shall be scored to the Catcher. 

(6) The number of "times the player assists 
shall be set down in the sixth column. An as- 
sist should be given to each player who handles 
the ball in a run-out or other play of the kind. 

An assist should be given to the Pitcher when 
a Batsman fails to hit the ball on the third strike. 

An assist should be given to the Pitcher in 
each case where the Batsman is declared out for 
making a foul strike or striking out of turn. 

An assist should be given to a player who 
makes a play in time to put a runner out, even if 
the player who should complete the play fails, 
through no fault of the player assisting. 

And generally an assist should be given to 
each player who handles the ball from the time it 
leaves the bat until it reaches the player who 
makes the put-out, or in case of a thrown ball, 
to each player who throws or handles it cleanly, 
and in such a way that a put-out results or would 
result if no error were made by the receiver. 

(7) An error should" be given for each mis- 
play which allows the striker or base-runner to 
make one or more bases, when perfect play 
would have insured his being put out. In scoring 
errors off batted balls, see (3) of this Rule. 



PLAYING RULES. 



73 



class viii: 

CONSTRUCTION AND AMENDMENTS. 
RULE 71. No section of these Rules shall be 
construed as conflicting with or affecting any 
article of the Constitution of the League, 

RULE 72. No Amendment or change of any 
of these Rules shall be made, except in the man- 
ner provided in the Constitution of the League. 



i 



74 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 






Special Meeting op the National League op Pro- 
pessional Base Ball Clubs held at the Adelphi 
Hotel, Saratoga Springs, N. Y., Thursday, Sep- 
tember 29, A. D. 1881. 
The meeting was called to order at 7:45 p. M. by the 

President. In the absence of Secretary Young, on motion 

of Mr. Soden, Mr. C. R. DeFreest was elected Secretary 

pro tern. 

The following delegates were present: 

Mr. W. A. Hulbert, representing the Chicago Ball Club. 



" W. G-. Thompson, 
" James Moffat, 
" T. C. Peckham, 
" A. H. Soden, 
" Freeman Brown, 
Messrs. A. L. Hotchkin 
and C. R. DeFreest, 
Messrs. G. W. Hull and 
J. F. Evans, 



Detroit B. B. Ass'n. 

Buffalo " " « 

Providence " " 

Boston " " " 

Worcester " " 

Troy City " " 

Cleveland " " 



An informal discussion was had relative to the expul- 
sion of players for confirmed dissipation and general 
insubordination, and the following preamble and resolu- 
tion were adopted: 

Whereas, We deem it to bo for the best interests of 
the National Game of Base Ball, and calculated to 
further the objects of the League as set forth in Article 
II of its Constitution (and to protect honorable and 
manly ball players who have complained of the conduct 
of the persons named, from further enforced association 
with them) to debar, from further participation in the 
exhibition of the game, the following named players: — 
S. P. Houck, Lipman Pike, L. P. Dickerson, M. J. Dor- 
gan, James J. Fox, Edward Nolan, Wm. Crowley, E. M. 
Gross, L. J. Brown and E. J. Caskins. 

Resolved, I. That we will not employ, in any capacity, 
any such persons. 

II. That we will not play any game of ball with any 



OP THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



75 



Club which employs or presents any of such persons as 
managers, umpires or players. 

III. These resolutions shall have full force and effect 
as to any and all of these persons named until revoked 
by unanimous vote of all the Clubs of the National 
League, at a regular meeting of the League. 

On motion, adjourned until the following day. 

Friday, Sept. 30, 1881. 

The League reconvened at 10 o'clock, a. m. 

The Secretary pro tern gave formal notice of the 
release of Edward Nolan, by the Cleveland Club, and of A. 
A. Irwin, by the Worcester Club; also of the suspension 
by the Cleveland Club of J. J. Smith, for the balance of 
the season of 1881, and for the season of 1882. 

The new form of players' contract was presented by 
the President, and unanimously adopted. The following 
agreement was then adopted: 

Jlho undersigned Associations, members of the National 
League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, do hereby agree, 
each with the others, that in contracting with players for 
the season of 1882, and for subsequent years, we will, 
in every instance, make use of the form of contract which 
is attached hereto, and now with this agreement, tiled 
with the Secretary of the League. No contract shall be 
made with any player, except in the form now agreed 
upon, nor shall the form be modified or changed in the 
case of any player or of any club, and in no case shall 
wages bo paid to any player on account of his contract 
before the same shall have been earned by him, except so 
far as money may be needed by him to pay his expenses 
from his home to join his club in the Spring. 

Ev'.iiy contract so to be made by each club with each 
of its players shall, after its execution by the parties to 
it, be forwarded to the Secretary of the League. If the 
Secretary shall find the contract to be in the prescribed 
form, he shall indorse upon it the date of its reception by 
him, and shall enter the date of its receipt, and the 



76 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



names of the parties to it, in a book to be kept for that 
purpose. He shall then return the contract to the club 
from which he shall have received it. In no case shall 
the Secretary notify other clubs of such contract, as 
provided in Section 2, Article XI of the Constitution, 
or act upon the contract until he shall have found it to 
be in proper form as herein agreed. 

Dated Saratoga Springs, N. Y., Sept. 30, A. D. 1881. 
The Chicago Ball Club, (Signed) by W. A. Hulbert, Prcs. 

' "A. H. Soden, " 
' " J. F. Evans, « 

" A. L. Hotchkin, " 
" Jas. Moffat, Vice " 
" T. C. Peckham. 
" Freeman Brown,Treas. 
" W. G.Thompson Pres. 



" Boston B. B. Ass'n, 

" Cleveland B. B. " 

" Troy City " " " 

" Buffalo ' " " " 

" Providence " " " 

" Worcester " " " 

" Detroit " " " 

It was moved and seconded that the agreement not to 
hire players for 1882 be abrogated. Carried. 

Mr. Hotchkin, from Troy, obtained unanimous consent 
to add the name of E. J. Caskins to the bkek list if it 
was decided so to do by the directors of the Troy club, 
and his name was subsequently added. 

Mr. Evans, of Cleveland, called the attention of the 
dele'gates to the abuse of Herman Doscher by Providence 
papers while he was acting as umpire in that city. An 
informal discussion was had on the subject. 

On motion adjourned. 

(Signed.) W. A. HULBERT, 

President. 

C. It. DeFreest, Secretary pro tern. 

Meeting of the Board of Directors of the National 
League of Professional B. B. Clubs held at tiie 
Trejiont House, Chicago, Tuesday, Dec. 6, A. D. 
1881. 
Meeting called to order at 8 o'clock, V. M., and on 

motion, adjourned to meet at 10 o'clock A. m. on the 

following day. 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



77 



Wednesday, Dec. 7, A. D. 1881. 

Meeting called to order at 10 o'clock A. m. 

Present. Mr. W. A. Hulbert, Chairman, and Messrs. 
Brown, Hotchkin, Smith and Thompson, Directors. (Mr. 
Smith representing the Buffalo elub in the absence of 
Mr. Jewett). 

The Secretary presented a tabular statement of champi- 
onship games won and lost during the season of 1881, 
showing the Chicago club to have won the greatest 
number. 

On motion, the following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That the Chicago Ball Club of Chicago, 
111., having won the greatest number of games in the 
championship series, is hereby awarded the championship 
of the United States for the year 1881. 

The report of the Treasurer was received and accepted. 

The Secretary presented the petition of Philip Baker» 
asking for the removal of disabilities caused by his 
expulsion from the Providence B. B. Association. On 
motion, the application of Mr. Baker for reinstatement 
was denied. 

• The Secretary also presented an appeal from Mr. C. W. 
Jones asking for a removal of his disabilities caused 
by his expulsion from the Boston B. B. Association. 

Mr. Thompson moved that it be the decision of this 
Board that this Board has no authority to consider any 
appeal from C. W. Jones, and therefore declines to act 
upon any such appeal. 

Mr. N. E. Young was re-elected Secretary. 
On motion adjourned. 

(Signed.) W. A. HULBERT, Chairman. 
" W. G. Thompson, ' 
" Jas. II. Smith, 
" A. L. Hotchkin, 
" Freeman Brown, 



- Directors. 



78 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



Annual Meeting or the National League of Pro- 
fessional B. B. Clubs, held at the Tremont 
House, Chicago, Wednesday, Dec. 7, A. D. 1881. 
Meeting called to order at 12 m. by the President. 
The following named gentlemen presented their cre- 
dentials as the representatives of their respective clubs, 
viz: 

W. A. Hulbert and 

A. G-. Mills, representing the Chicago Ball Club. 

A. H. Soden and 

Harry Wright, " " Boston B. B. Ass'n. 

J. F. Evans, " " Cleveland " " " 

H. B. Winship, " " Providence " « 

A. L. Hotchkin, " " Troy City " " 

W. G. Thompson, " " Detroit " " 

Jas. H. Smith, " « Buffalo « Club. 

Freeman Brown, " " Worcester " " 

On motion, the reading of the minutes of the last 
meeting was dispensed with. The report of the Board 
of Directors was presented and accepted. 

The meeting next proceeded to consider amendments 
to the League Constitution, pending the consideration of 
■which, on motion adjourned to meet at 9:30 A. M. on the 
following day. 

Thursday, Deo. 8, A. D. 1881. 

Meeting called to order at 9:30 A. m., and continued 
the consideration of amendments to the League Consti- 
tution, which, as amended, was adopted as follows. (See 
Constitution.) 

The meeting next proceeded to consider amendments 
to the Playing Rules, which, as amended, were adopted 
as follows. (See Playing Rules.) 

On motion, the following resolutions were adopted: 

Resolved, That the next annual meeting of the League 
be held at Hotel Dorrance, Providence, R. I. 

Resolved, That the President of the League is hereby 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAQUE. 



79 



empowered to reconvene this annual meeting of the 
League at any time prior to April 1, 1882. 

The President appointed Messrs. Brown, Evans and 
Winship as a committee on posters. 

The following named gentlemen were duly elected to- 
compose a part of the staff of League umpires for 1882. 
(See list of umpires.) 

On motion, the publication of the League book was 
left in the hands of the Secretary. 

The President appointed Messrs. Soden, Winship and 
Thompson a committee to confer with, and receive bids 
from manufacturers present, for furnishing the necessary 
number of balls for the use of the League clubs during 
the year 1882. The committee reported in favor of the 
" Spalding League Ball," and the contract for furnishing 
the same was duly awarded to Messrs. A. G. Spalding & 
Bros, of Chicago, 111. 

The following resolution offered by Mr. Evans was 
adopted: 

Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed, of 
which the President shall be a member, to select a uni- 
form for the eight League clubs. 

The President appointed Messrs. Winship, Hotchkin 
and Hulbert as such committee. 

On motion, the election of the requisite number to 
complete the staff of League umpires was deferred until 
the next meceting. 

Messrs. Hulbert and Soden were duly elected a com- 
mittee to prepare a schedule for the season of 1 882. 

On motion adjourned to meet at 9:30 A. si. on the 
following day. 

Friday, Dec. 9, A. D. 1881. 

Meeting called to order at 9:30 A. m. 

The committee on uniforms presented their report and 
the following agreement was duly signed. (See agree- 
ment as to uniforms.) 

Mr. Winship, in behalf of the Providence club, 



I . 



oO 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



requested the reinstatement of Mr. E. M. Gross, formerly 
of their club, who was ineligible to participate in League 
or League Alliance games by reason of his name having 
been placed on the " black list " at a special meeting of 
the League held at Saratoga Springs, N. Y., Sept. 29, 
1881. 

After a lengthy informal discussion [of the question, 
on motion of Mr. Thompson the action of the Saratoga 
meeting was unanimously reaffirmed. Mr. W. A. Hulbert 
was unanimously re-elected President of the League. 

The following named gentlemen were elected, with the 

President, to constitute the Board of Directors for the 

ensuing year, namely: Josiah Jewett, W. G. Thompson, 

Freeman Brown and A. L. Hotchkin. 

No further business appearing, on motion adjourned. 

(Signed.) W. A. HULBEBT, 

President. 
N. E. Young, 

Secretary. 

AGREEMENT AS TO UNIFORMS. 

The parties hereto agree that in all Championship 
Games during the year 1882, they will present the nines 
of their respective clubs in uniforms consisting of the 
following specified articles and colors: 







Pants 










Shirts. 


and 
Belt. 


Cap. 


Shoes. 


Tic 


Catcher 


Scarlet 


White 


Scarlet 


Leather 


White. 


Pitcher 


Light blue 


" 


Light blue 






«* 


First Baseman 


Scarlet «& white 


11 


Scarlet & white 






■i 


Second Basem'n 


Orange H black 


11 


Orange M black 






M 


Third Baseman 


Gray " white 


" 


Gray and white 






H 


Short Stop 


Maroon 


*) 


Maroon 






H 


Right Kidder 


Grav 


M 


Gray 






41 


Center Fielder 


Red" and black 


II 


Red and black 






II 


Left Fielder 


White 


H 


White 






M 


Substitute 


Green 


" 


Green 






** 


Subslitue 


Brown 


II 


Brown 




M 



Caps — Square top. Colors same as shirts. 



OP THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



81 



The colors of the stockings of all players in the nines 
of each club, shall be as follows : 

Boston, red. Detroit, old gold. 

Chicago, white. Troy City, green. 

Buffalo, gray. Cleveland, navy blue. 

Worcester, brown. Providence, light blue. 

The Chicago Ball Club, (Signed) by W. A. Hulbcrt, Pres. 



" Boston B. B. Ass'n 
" Detroit " " 
" Cleveland " " " 
" "Worcester " " " 
" Troy City " " " 
" Buffalo, " " " 
" Providence " " " 
Chicago, Dec. 9, 1881. 



A. H. Soden, 
" W. G. Thompson " 
" J. P. Evans, 
" Fi'eeman Brown, Tr's. 
" A. L. Hotehkin, Dir. 
" Jas. H. Smith, Del. 
" H. B. Winship, " 



BUSINESS AGREEMENT. 

Chicago, Deo. 9, A. D. 1881. 

The parties hereto agree that during the year 1882, 
they will govern themselves in all matters pertaining to 
base ball by the provisions of the Constitution of the 
National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, and 
especially in all; business matters with each other by the 
provisions of Section 73 of the said Constitution. 

We each and all hereby obligating ourselves to fully 
discharge the obligations specified in said Section. 
The Worcester B. B. Club, Freeman Proton, Treasurer. 
The Chicago Ball Club, W. A. Eulbert, President. 
The Boston B. B. Association, A. II. Soden, President. 
The Cleveland B. B. Association, J. F. Evans, President. 
The Providence B. B. Association, II. B. Winship, 

Delegate. 
The Buffalo B. B. Club, Jas. H. Smith, Delegate. 
The Detroit B. B. Club, W. G. Thompson, President. 
The Troy City B. B. Association, A. L. Hotehkin, 

Director. 



82 

SPECIAL LEAGUE MEETING. 

March 7, 1882. 
Special Meeting of the National League of Profes- 
sional Base Ball Clubs, held at the Osborn 
House, Rochester, N. Y., Tuesday, March 7, 1882. 

In the absence of President Hulbert, the meeting was 
called to order by Secretary Young at 10 o'clock a. m. 

On motion Mr. A. H. Soden was elected chairman pro 
tern. 

The following named gentlemen were present as the 
representatives of their respective clubs : 
A. G. Spalding, representing the Chicago Ball Club. 
" " " Cleveland B. B. Assoc'n. 

Jas. Moffatt, and 
J. A. Mugridge " 

Hon. W. G. Thompson, " 
A. H. Soden, " 

Harry Wright, " 

W. 0. Wilder, " 

A. L. Hotchkin, " 

The first business in order 



Buffalo " " 

Detroit " " 

Boston " " 

Providence " " 

Worcester " " 

Troy City " " 

being the election of the 
necessary number of League Umpires to complete the list 
for 1882, the following named gentlemen were duly 
elected. (See list of Umpires.) 

The committee appointed to prepare a schedule of 
League games for 1882 submitted their report, which was 
very promptly and unanimously adopted. 

On motion it was unanimously resolved, as the sense of 
this meeting, that no League club could play any League 
Alliance club during the month of April upon any other 
than the regular League rules governing games between 
League and League Alliance clubs. . 

The Secretary was authorized and empowered to ar- 
range the hotel rates in the various League cities for the 
season of 1882. 

No further business appearing, on motion adjourned. 
(Signed) A. H. SODEN, 

N. E. Young, President pro tern. 

Secretary. 



81 



[copy.] 

AGREEMENT 

IN RELATION TO ENGAGEMENT OP PLAYERS POR l88t 

The undersigned associations, members of the National 
League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, do hereby a^ree 
each with the others, that neither they, nor any officer 
member or agent of their respective organizations shall 
contract with, employ, engage or negotiate with any 
player for services during the season of 1883, or subse- 
quent seasons, p ior to October 23, 1882. 

In testimony whereof the parties hereto have hereunto 
set their names, in the city of Rochester, this 7th dav of 
March, 1882. * 

The Boston B. B. Association, 

By A. H. Soden, President. 
The Providence B. B. Association, 

By Harry Wright, Manager. 
The Worcester B. B. Association, 

By W. 0. Wilder, Delegate. 
The Troy City B. B. Association, 

By A. L. Hotchkin, Director. 
The Buffalo B. B. Association, 

By Jas. Moffat, Vice-President. 
The Cleveland B. B. Association, 

By A. G. Spalding, Delegate. 
The Detroit B. B. Association, 

By W. O. Thompson, President. 
The Chicago Ball Club, 

By A. O. Spalding, Secretary. 






84 



LEAGUE CLUBS FOB 1882. 



OFFICERS AND PLAYERS. 

The following is an official list of the Officers of the Na- 
tional League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, and Officer, 
and Players of Clubs belonging to ihe "National League of 
Professional Base Ball Clubs," and Officers and Players of clubs, 
members thereof, for the season of 18S2, so far as completed, 
March S, 1S82. 



W. A. HULBERT, President, No. 108 Michigan Avenue, 

Chicago, 111. 
N. E. YOUNG, Secretary, P. O. Box No. 536, Washington, 

D. C. Telegrams to Second Auditor's Office. 

DIRECTORS. 
Josiah Jewett, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Hon, W. G. Thompson, Detroit, Mich. 
Freeman Brown, Worcester, Mass. 
A. L. Hotchkin, Troy, N. Y. 

BOSTON BASE BALL ASSOCIATION, OF BOSTON, 
MASS. 



H. Soden, President, 

No. 116 Water Street. 
Joseph Hornung, 
Thomas Deasley, 
J. E. Whitney, 
P. J. Hotaling, 
H. M. McClure, 



F. P. Roundy, Secretary. 

E. B. Sutton, 
Robert Matthews, 
J. J. Burdock, 
Edward Rowen, 
S. W. Wise. 



BUFFALO BASE BALL ASSOCIATION OF 
BUFFALO, N. Y. 
Josiah Jewett, President. Geo. H. Hugiison, Secretary. 

No. j 1 White Fire Proof Building, 
Dennis Brouthers, 
Chas. J. Foley, 
H. Richardson, 
John C. Rowe, 



David W. Force, 
Wm. A. Purcell, 
James O'Rourke, 
Jas. F. Galvin, 
Thos. Morrissey, 



Hugh Daily 



Jas. L. White, 
ily. 



LEAGUE CLUBS FOR. 1882. 



85 



CHICAGO BALL CLUB, OF CHICAGO, ILL 
W. A. Hulbert, President, A. G. Spalding, Secretary, 



208 Michigan Avenue 
Thomas Burns, 
F. S. Flint, 
F. E. Goldsmith, 
A. Dalrymple, 
Geo. F. Gore, 



Adrian C. Anson 



10S Madison Street. 
Lawrence Corcoran, 
M. J. Kelly, 
E. N. Williamson, 
J. L. Quest, 
Hugh Nicol, 



CLEVELAND BASE BALL ASSOCIATION, OF 
CLEVELAND, O. 



C. H. Bulkeley, President. 



E. A. Harvey, Secretary. 



John Kelly, 
Jas. McCormick, 
Fred. Dunlap, 
John Glasscock, 
M. J. Kennedy, 



T. J. Esterbrook, 
\V. B. Phillips, 
Michael Muldoon, 
Geo. W. Bradley, 
Geo. Shatter, 
Jno. Richmond. 



DETROIT BASE BALL ASSOCIATION, OF DE- 
TROIT, MICH. 

Hon. W. G. Thompson, President. F. C. Bancroft, Man'r 
Mayor's OJJice. 
Alonzo Knight, Edward Hanlon, 

Jos. J. Gerhardt, C. W. Bennett, 

Geo. E. Weidman, Geo. A. Wood, 

Saml. W. Trott, Martin J. Powell, 

Jos. F. Farrell, Geo. H. Derby, 

Jno. Troy. 



PROVIDENCE BASE BALL ASSOCIATION, OF 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



Henry B. Winship, President, 
Lock Box 609. 
Chas. Radbourn, 
J. M. Ward, 
Thomas York, 
Jos. Stuart, 



Timothy Manning 



Harry Wright, Manager 
No. 16 Mcsser St. 
John Farrell, 
P. A. Hines, 
Jeremiah Denny, 
B. Gilligan, 



86 



LEAGUE CLUBS FOR 1882. 



WORCESTER BASE BALL ASSOCIATION, OF 
WORCESTER, MASS. 

Hon. C. B. Pratt, President. Freeman Brown, Secretary, 

"Sj>y Office." 
E. Coggswell, Geo. Creamer, 

Fred. Corey, John W. O'Rourke, 

J. L. Richmond, L. J. McP. Rundlett, 

H. D. Stovey, A. A. Irwin, 

A. J. Bushong, Fred. I. Mann, 

T. H. Bond, Jacob Evans, 

Jno. J. Hayes. 



TROY CITY BASE BALL ASSOCIATON, OF 
TROY, N. Y. 
Francis N. Mann, President. C. R. DeFreest, Secretary 
W. H. Holbert, P. Gillespie, 

Wm. Ewing, Michael Welch, 

Fred. Pfeffer, Rodger Conner, 



J. P. Cassidy, 
T. J. Keele, 



Jas. Roseman, 
John J. Smith. 



The following officers have been designated by their respective 
clubs to receive all communications as required by the League 
Constitution. 

Boston B. B. Club, A. H. Soden, President, 

116 Water Street. 
Buffalo B. B. Club, Geo. H. Hughson, Secretary, 

No. II White Fire Proof Building. 
Chicago Ball Club, Wm. A. Hulbkrt, President, 

10S Michigan Avenue. 
Cleveland B. B. Club, Geo. W. Howe, Secretary, 

No. 6 House Block. 
Detroit B. B. Club, Hon. W. G. Thompson, President, 

Mayor's Office. 
Providence B. B. Club, Harry Wright, Manager, 

16 Me<ser Street. 
Worcester B. B. Club, Freeman Brown, Secretary, 

"Spy Office." 
Troy City B. B. Club, A. L. Hotchkin, Director, 

Tray, N. T. 



SCHEDULE OF LEAGUE GAMES FOR 1 882. 



1882. 


6 

si 

6 


o 
A 


«3 
a 

*j el 

<1'3 

> 

O 


6 

3 

m 


^ ID 

5 

« 


a 
a 

a 

H 

p 


B 

O 








May 25 


May 5 


May 1 


June 14 


June 9 


Juno 3 


May 80 
* H 






" 26 


" 6 


" 2 


"• 15 


" 10 


" 6 






" 27 


" 8 


" 3 


" 17 


" 12 


" 7 


June 1 


IMcsgo. 




Jnly 28 
" 29 


Sept. 22 
,r 23 


Sept. 27 
•• 28 


Aug. 3 
" 6 


Aug. 9 
'• 10 


Aug. 22 
•' 24 


Aug. 16 
.<P 17 






" 31 


" 25 


" 30 


" 7 


" 12 


" 26 


" 21 




May 20 




May 1 


May 5 


June 3 


May 30 


June 9 


June 14 




■' 22 




2 


" 6 


6 


" 31 


'• 10 


" 15 




" 23 




" 3 


8 


" 7 


June 1 


» 12 


" 1« 


Detroit, 


July 11 




Sept. 27 


Sept. 22 


Aug. 22 


Aug. 16 

>P 17 


Aug. 3 


Aug. 9 




" 12 




" 28 


" 23 


'• 24 


" 5 


,p 10 




" 13 




" 30 


" 25 


" 26 


" 19 


" 7 


" 14 




May 10 


May 16 




May 25 


June 9 


June 14 


May 30 


June 5 




'■ 11 


" 17 




" 26 


" 10 


" 15 


" 31 


" 6 




" 18 


" 18 




" 27 


" 12 


" 17 


June 1 


" 7 


eievcl'nd 


July 22 July 15 




July 28 


Aug. » 


Aug. 3 


Aug. 16 


Aug. 22 




«■ 25 


" 18 




" 29 


" 10 


" 5 


" 17 


" 23 




" 26 


•' 20 




" 31 


" 12 


■' 7 


" 19 


" 24 




May 16 


May 10 


May 20 




May 30 


June 3 


June 14 


•June 9 




" 17 


" 11 


" 22 




" 31 


" 6 


" 15 


" 10 




" 18 


" 13 


" 23 




June 1 


" 7 


'• 17 


" 12 


Buffalo. 


July 15 


July 22 


July 11 




Aug. 16 


Aug. 22 


Aug. 9 


Aug. 3 




" 18 


" 25 


" 12 




" 24 


" 10 


5 




" 20 


" 26 


" 13 




" 19 


" 26 


" 1 


" 7 




June 29 


July 4 


June 20 


June 24 




May 10 


May 'J 


May 20 




" 30 


" 6 


" 21 


" 26 




,f 12 


" 16 


" 22 




July 1 


" 8 


" 22 


" 27 




" 27 


« 18 


" 23 


BOItCB. 


Aug. 29 


Sept. 5 


Sept. 12 


Sept. 16 




July 15 


Jnly 11 


July 24 




" 31 


" 7 


•• 13 


" 19 




" 19 


" 13 


" 25 




Sept. 2 


" 9 


" 14 


'• 20 




Sept. 28 


" 28 


" 26 




June 24 
" 26 


June zQ 
" 21 


July 4 
" 6 


June 29 
" 30 


May 11 
" 13 




May 5 
8 


May 16 
" 17 




" 27 


" 22 


" 8 


July 1 


" 25 




'• 22 


" 18 


Pmrld'ee 


Sept. 12 
«' 13 


Sept.. 16 
■' 19 


Sept. 5 


Aug. 29 
'• 31 


July 18 
" 20 




July 25 
Sept. 22 


July 11 
" 12 




" 14 


" 20 


" 9 


Sept. 2 


Sept. 30 




" 25 


" 13 




June 20 


June 24 


June 29 


Jnly 4 


May 1 


May 6 




May 25 




" 21 


" 26 


" 80 


" 6 


" 3 


" 20 




" 26 


Woreii'r 


•' 22 

Sept. 16 
• f 19 


" 27 

Sept. 12 

• r 13 


July 1 

Aug. 29 

" 81 


Sept. 5 
" 7 


" 17 

Jnly 12 

" 29 


" 23 

July 22 

» 26 




" 27 

July 17 

" 18 




" 20 


" 14 


Sept. 2 


9 


" 31 


Sept. 23 




" 20 




July 4 
" 6 


June 29 
" 30 


June 24 
•' 26 


June 20 
" 21 


May 5 
'• 6 


May 1 


May 10 
" 11 




Troy Ci'.? 


" 8 

Sept, 5 

" 7 


July 1 
Aug. 29 

a 31 


" 27 

Sept. 16 
• r 19 


" 22 

Sept. 12 
x 13 


" 8 

Sept. 22 
" 23 


" 8 

July 28 
" 29 


" 13 

Sept. 27 

•• 28 






" 9 


Sept. 2 


" 20 


" 141 " 25 


«' 31 M 3U 



^m 



88 



LEAGUE UMPIRES FOR 1882. 

1. Charles Maddock, White Sewing Machine Factory, 

Cleveland, Ohio. 

2. John Kelly, No. 60S 10th Avenue, New York. 

3. Joseph Quinn, No. 161 Prospect Street, Cambridge- 

port, Mass. 

4. Joseph Dunnigan, No. 345 Spring Street, New York. 

5. Richard Pearce, No. 7 DeKalb Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

6. Wm. Barnie, No. 190 Prince Street, " " 
.7. John Daily, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

8. Richard Higham. No. 24 Federal Street, Troy, N. Y. 

9. Charles Briody, Lansingburg, N. Y. 

10. W. E. Furlong, Milwaukee, Wis. 

11. Wm. McLean, No. 743 N. 45th Street, Philadel- 

phia, Pa. 

12. Wm. Hawes, Lowell, Mass. 

13. Timothy H. Donavan, No. 62 Middlesex Street, Bos- 

ton, Mass. 

14. Thomas Carey, No. 449 N. Calhoun Street, Balti- 
more, Md. 

15. Chas. L. Bullemore, Victoria, Ontario. 

16. James L. Hickey, 370 E. Eagle St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

17. Michael Lawler, Troy, N. Y. 

18. Herman Doscher, Lansingburg, N. Y. 

19. Daniel Guiney, 247 Sixth St., Detroit, Mich. 

20. Wm. A. Reid, London, Ont. (Reid's Hotel.) 

21. David F. Sullivan, 107 Sigel St., Chicago, 111. 

22. Jno. R. Sullivan, 15 State St., Providence, R. I. 

23. Geo. W. Lavers, Boston, Mass. 

24. Charles Smith, Worcester, Mass. 



LEAGUE ri.AYER's AVERAGES. 



89 



BATTING AVERAGES 

Of players who have taken part in fifteen or more Championship Games 
DURING THE SEASON OF 1881. 









■0 













to <n 












;-> 








.t2 


=53 


« 





M 

a 

OS 


NAME. 


CLUB. 


OS 

5 

ta 

8 


sS 

00 
« 

s 
343 


00 

a 
61 


So? 

p. 
< 

0.79 


a 

« 
CO 

1ST 


"0 2 

£3 


at 
d 

n 

3 


Eh 


1)CJ5 


1 




Chicago. . .. . 


84 


.399 


179 


2.13 


8 






5b 


KID 


47 


0.85 


74 


.3: J .8 


92 


1 or 


8 


Rowe ' 


Buffalo 


61 


246 30 


0.49 


82 


.333 


115 


1.88 


4 


Start 


Providence .... 


vy 


348 56 


0.71 


114 


.327 


18R 


1.74 


ft 






78 


845 59 


0.7b 


112 


.324 


ir,o 


1.92 


6 


(Kelly 

| Dalrymple.... 




80 


353 84 


1.05 


114 


.323 


154 


1 92 




81 


862 72 


11.89 


117 


.323 


149 


1.8i 


7 


Brouthcrs 


Unffalo 


bo 


27060 


0.92 


Kb 


.318 


139 


2.13 


R 


Dickerson.... 


Worcester 


80 


3ti7 IH 


O.bO 


lib 


.316 


1 1.; 


1.82 


9 


Kennedy .... 


Cleveland 


38 


150 


19 


0.50 


47 


.313 


56 


1.47 


10 


( White 

■j Flint 


Buffalo 


Vb 


319 


58 


0.74 


99 


310 


127 


1.6S 




80 
713 


80b 
313 


46 

50 


0.57 
0.65 


95 
96 


.310 
• 306 


117 

120 




11 


Hotaling 


1.58 


12 


York 


Providence 


84 


312 


56 


0.6b 


95 


.301 


131 


1.59 


13 


1 O'Kourke.... 


Detroit 


7b 


299 


44 


0.5S 


90 


.301 


141 


1.89 




83 


SIS 


71 


0.8D 


105 


.301 


140 


1.08 


14 






73 


309 


8b 


1.18 


92 


• 297 


131 


1.79 


15 






8U 


3:1V 


M 


O.b'i 


100 


• 296 


143 


1.77 


Ifi 




Boston 


83 


BSD 


43 


51 


97 


• 291 


lib 


1 89 


17 


Richardson. . 


Buffalo 


81 


344 


62 


0.74 


100 


.290 


145 


1.74 


Ifl 






8(1 


811 


47 


0.58 


90 


.289 


115 


1.43 


19 




Troy City.. ,... 


84 


861 


54 


0.64 


104 


.288 


139 


1.65 


M 


Ferguson...,. 


" 


81 


334 


55 


O.bb 


9b 


.287 


122 


1.45 


21 




Providence 


79 


35« 


64 


0.81 


101 


• 283 


144 


1.82 


22 






24 


108 


13 


0.54 


29 


.281 


33 


1.37 


23 


t Welch 


Detroit 


75 


808 


43 


0.57 


86 


.279 


115 


1.53 




3U 


143 


12 


0.30 


30 


.279 


42 


1.07 


21 






75 


805 


():: 


0.84 


85 


.278 


120 


1.60 


25 


J Burns 

1 GilleBpie 


Chicago 


84 


312 


41 


0.48 


95 


.277 


188 


1.58 




83 


313 


13 


51 


95 


■ ''77 


118 


1.39 


M 


Richmond. .. 
1 Holbeit 




2b 
51 


98 
182 


18 
15 


0.50 
0.29 


60 


.275 
.274 


37 
70 


1.42 


27 


Providence 


1.37 


Troy City 


44 


175 


15 


0.84 


48 


.274 


52 


1.18 




1 Doi'san..- 




6'.) 
59 


295 
254 


(2 

11 


0.00 

0.69 


80 
69 


• 271 

.271 


97 
71 


1 40 


to 


Wot. .t Det.... 


1.20 








74 


830 


5 ' 


0.74 


91 


.270 


135 


1.82 


29 


■{Phillips 




84 


851 


50 


0.59 


95 


.270 


13:i 


1.58 




( Knisht 




R3 


340 


67 


0.80 


92 


.270 


119 


1.43 


M 


Williamson.. 


Chicago 


RJ 


843 


56 


0.68 


92 


.2118 


120 


1.46 


31 


Irwin 


Worcester 


49 


208 


27 


0.55 


54 


.266 


71 


1.45 


12 


Glasscock. .. 


Cleveland 


t4 


830 


!' 


0.58 


86 


.260 


106 


1.26 


33 


1 Shaffer 

1 MoCormick. . 


u 


84 


:•; 


17 


56 


87 


.25* 


117 


1.89 


■1 


69 


303 


IS 


0.65 


78 


.257 


08 


1.42 


H 


FoUy 




fc>3 


375 


58 


0.69 


fcb 


.258 


122 


1.47 



90 i^eague player's averages. 

Batting Averages — Continued. 



NAME. 



Whitney.... 

Crowley 

Clapp 

I Nolan 

I Richmond. . 

Bradley 

Quest 

Brown 

j Ewing. 

1 Purcell 

i Gerhardt.... 
I Evans 

Ward 

(Goldsmith... 

■J Denny 

( Hornung. ... 

DeaBley 

j Burdock 

IFarrell 

Moynahan... 

Keefe 

Bushong 

Snyder. 

Caskins 

Corcoran. . . . 

J Corey 

i Radboum . . 

j Casstdy 

1 Lewis 

Gllligan 

Reilly 

Peters 

Galvin 

j Creamer 

I Carpenter... 

Taylor 

Nlcol 

Ilanklnson. 

Sullivan 

Derby 

Whitney 

j Matthews... 
I Force 

Fox 

Remsen 

Lynch 

MeClellan... 

Smith 



CLUB. 



Boston.. 



Cleveland.. 



Worcester 

Cleveland 

Chicago 

Detroit & Prov. 

Troy City 

Cleve'd & Buff. 

Detioit 

Troy City 

Providence 

Chicago 

Providence 

Boston 



Providence.. 
Clev'd & Detr't 

Troy City 

Worcester 

Boston 

Troy City 

Chicago 

Worcester 

Providence 

Troy City 

Boston 

Providence 

Detroit & Wor 
Buffalo 



Worcester. . 



Wor.Clev.& Det 

Chicago 

Troy City... 

Buffalo 

Detroit 



Prov. & Boston 

Buffalo 

Boston 

Cleveland 

Buffalo 

Providence ... 
Clev.Wor.ABuff 



257 
16S 
247 

i!3U 
293 
18!) 

m 

193 
887 
810 
852 
158 
816 
824 
147 
282 
341 
141 
152 
271 
219 
284 
189 
199 
267 
865 
11) 
17!! 

74 
229 
KM 
80S 
Ml 
ISO 
108 
316 
121 
236 
214 
128 
278 
118 
172 

78 
255; 

86 1 5 



5:1 



0.50 

0.46 

0.70 

0, 

0.48 

0.34 

0.45 

0.52 

0.58 



0.43 

0.43 

0.6' 

0.60 

0.44 

0.48 

0.S2 

0.49 

0.80 

0.37 

0.38 

0.45 

0.2) 

0.53 

0.53 

0.44 

0.3' 

0.66 

0.63 

0.40 

0.50 

0.39 

0.30 

0.53 

0.47 

0.30 

0.50 

0.40 

0.42 

0.28 

0.39 

1). 23 

0.28 

0.26 

0.29 

0.26 

0.46 

8.20 



IS 






.255 
.254 
.253 
.251 
.251 
.250 
.249 
.244 
.243 
.243 
.242 
.242 
.241 
.240 
.240 
.240 
.238 
.237 
.237 
.234 
.230 
.229 
.228 
.226 
.222 
.221 
.221 
.219 
.219 
.218 
.210 
.214 
.211 
.209 
.209 
.207 
.203 
.198 
.190 
.186 
.182 
.179 
.179 
.178 
174 
.166 
.164 
Mi 



98 
82 
82 
49 
69 
76 
SO 
S3 
90 
63 

n 

97 
U6 

4 'J 

98 
111 
42 
VJ 
121 
39 
41 
75 
66 
61 
62 
69 
117 
102 
31 
48 
18 
59 
69 
79 
ill 
81 
24 
79 
26 
4'J 
64 
26 

n 

21 
39 

16 
<» 

( 



a, - 
to 3 

|S 

C at 

to 



1.82 
1.15 
1.26 
1.22 
1.15 
1.28 
1.04 
1.43 
1.38 
1.28 
1.21 
1.19 
1.88 
1.22 
1.16 
1.33 
1.05 
122 
1.45 
1.11 
0.95 
1.00 
0.93 
0.98 
1.10 
1.18 
0.95 
1.21 
1.15 
1.06 
090 
1.09 
1.11 
1.00 
1.14 
1.03 
0.92 
0.94 
0.84 
0.83 
0.93 
0.78 
0.81 
0.70 
0.81 
0.M 
0.74 
0.81 



LEAGUE PLAYERS AVERAGES. 



91 



FIELDING AVERAGES 

Of Player* who have taken part in 15 or more Championship Game*. 
SEASON OF 1881. 



FIRST BASEMEN. 




Anson .... 
Morrill... 
Phillips .. 

Start 

Foley 

Brown.... 

Storey 

Dorgan . . . 

Brouthers 

| Connors . . 

Powell 

White.... 



CLUBS. 



Chicago 

Boston 

Cleveland 

Providence 

Buffalo 

Detroit and Providen'e 

Worcester. 

Worcester and Detroit. 

Buffalo. 

Troy City 

Detroit 

Buffalo' 







til 






*o 


O 


I 






>> 


a 


■/-■ 


h 


g 


hi 

a 


a 


< 

to 

a 


a 


o 

■3 


o 


'A 


H 


24 


959 


83 


892 


43 


74 


743 


37 


25 


805 


84 


791 


23 


89 


843 


79 


837 


17 


33 


887 


28 


29.! 


10 


13 


315 


31 


292 


9 


13 


314 


56 


553 


15 


27 


595 


27 


313 


10 


16 


839 


30 


321 


11 


17 


849 


84 


826 


40 


■It 


91U 


54 


513 


17 


SI 


561 


25 


256 


8 


te 


280 



O 

2 » 
a "o 



.975 
.969 
.905 
.962 
.958 
.958 
.954 
.953 
.951 
.951 
.944 
.942 



SECOND BASEMEN. 



1 






53 
76 

72 
78 
80 
79 
84 
81 
25 


108 
2:18 
202 
258 
259 
228 
259 
210 
63 


218(26 


412 
521 
449 
561 
552 
526 
563 
542 
187 


.936 


•> 






249 37 


.92* 


<1 






207 
251 
242 
217 
251 
268 
88 


10 
SI 
51 
51 
55 
ill 
36 


.910 


4 






.909 


5 




.wi 


r, 






.903 


1 






.902 


II 


Farrell 




.882 


9 






.807 



THIRD BASEMEN. 



Williamson 
Hankinson . 

Sutton 

Bradley 

Whitney..., 
Carpenter . 

Deuny 

O'Rourke... 



Chicago . . . 
Troy City. . 

Boston 

Cleveland . 
Detroit ... 
Worcester . 
Providence 
Buffalo .... 



74 


117 


194 


31 


342 


84 


149 


169 


33 


351 


78 


114 


157 


:;s 


309 


48 


78 


76 


24 


178 


5S 


73 


141 


38 


352 


82 


138 


171 


M 


31)5 


84 


142 


179 


60 


381 


66 


85 


80 


86 


201 



.909 
.906 
.877 
.865 
.849 
.846 
.842 






92 



LEAGUE PLAYERS AVERAGES. 

FIELDING AVERAGES-Continued. 
SHORT STOPS. 



i 


NAME. 


CLUBS. 


13 

<u 
l>> 

a 

K 
V 

a 

03 

a 


o 


0< 
u 

a 

83 


bo 

.2 

'm 

00 

O 

a 


•0 

O 

H 

s 


m 
o 

s 

a) 
J3 
O 

o 
Eh 


°s 

-j o 

3. 

a) A 
PhU 


1 






19 
79 
62 
24 
21 
79 
53 
75 
62 
50 
49 


25 
105 
85 
20 
3Ii 
100 
102 
88 
91 
59 
49 


78 
274 
205 
94 
84 
2-19 
1S3 
241 
214 
147 
153 


6 
B7 

30 
13 
15 
52 
43 

5.1 

52 
35 
36 


109 
416 
820 
127 
135 
401 
32b 
379 
857 
241 
238 


.945 






911 






Troy City 


906 


■1 






.897 






RH8 








870 








869 


ft 




Detroit 


.868 




(Barnes 

| McClellan 




854 


9 




854 


10 






.848 



FIELDERS. 



1 






24 
83 
81 
83 
26 
78 
18 
28 
73 


59 
198 
139 
177 
44 
179 
27 
52 
141 
61 
176 
153 
116 
30 
120 
130 
142 
146 
117 
65 
132 
140 
158 
60 
85 
£5 
143 
37 
37 
56 
79 
71 
27 
19 
18 


4 
19 
30 
16 
11 
45 

5 

7 
15 
14 
14 
28 
21 

1 
24 
17 
20 
21 
.7 

b 
18 
21 
17 

5 
31 

6 
14 

6 

6 

7 
14 

I 

8 
7 


2 
12 
12 
14 

4 
21 

3 

6 
18 

9 
22 
22 
17 

4 
19 
20 
23 
21 
18 
11 
24 
26 
29 
12 
22 

8 
31 

9 

9 
U 
24 
23 
11 
11 
11 


65 
229 
lbl 
207 

59 
245 

35 

65 
174 

87 
212 
203 
154 

35 
163 
167 
185 
191 
142 

61 
174 
187 
204 

13S 
49 

168 
52 
52 
79 

117 

103 
43 
38 
36 


(MS 






,947 






,938 








932 


4 


■j Nicol 


.9:12 




1 Richardson 

( O'Ronrke 


Buffalo 


.914 


b 


Worcester and Detroit. 


.914 


6 




91)7 






896 








816 








•76 
80 
81 
18 
84 
71 
84 
71 
48 
32 
80 
73 
84 
27 
66 
27 
81 
■„0 
24 
35 
50 
44 
21 
17 
21 


896 


8 




891 


9 


Knight . 




R89 


1i 






885 


11 






883 


1-» 






RRO 


1" 






875 


11 




874 


IB 






873 


1(1 




Cleveland and Detroit. 


864 


17 


Wood 


R62 


1° 






Rfil 


19 


York 




8iR 


"<i 




Wor., Cleve and Det. . . 


844 


?1 




81(1 


.,., 




Boston 


817 


.) > 




835 


21 






.827 

8->7 


ft 


Buffalo 


707 


•?6 


14 

Cleveland and Buffalo. 
Providence and Boston 
Buffalo 


7<r> 


T7 




7ti; 


H 




744 


"'i 






30 






.694 



■M 



LEAGUE PLATERS AVERAGES. 



93 



CATCHERS' AVERAGES. 



A 


NAME. 


CLUB. 


3 

i 

3 




O 

£ 

oj 

a 
1 


a 
oa 

a 


GO 

o 

a 

£ 


a! 
"3 

cq 

V 
05 

Ph 


m 

0J 

o 

a 

OS 

.a 

o 


4 

9 

a 

8,-4 
3 « 


1 






67 
34 
75 
43 
41 
31 
77 
43 
SO 
25 
45 
58 
89 


418 
181 
359 
211 
195 
807 
319 
187 
240 
138 
201) 
281 
108 


85 
39 

120 
89 
67 
38 
92 
39 
70 
27 
71 

105 
31 


20 
16 
40 
28 
24 
21 
27 
25 
37 
15 
34 
42 
24 


38 
25 
53 
81 
28 
29 
58 
88 
56 
33 
54 
99 
49 


561 
261 
572 
359 
314 
29:! 
496 
289 
403 
208 
365 
507 
212 


896 


t 






843 




Holbert 




817 


4 


Troy City 


835 


s 




.834 


6 




,8->9 


7 






828 


8 


Rowe 


Buffalo 


.782 
.769 


« 






769 


in 


Clevelfcud 


.758 


u 

12 




721 




Buffalo 


.651 






94 



LEAGUE 1'J.TCHERS' RECORD. 



' — » o "^ a O ■ O rt> o o 

E O L- . t m ■-*• . i__- <—• r-. 



§I : - B 



£-: < a < 5 i E^ o 35 



SO 



r 2.2.S. _ s» it, o o 2 t» 



Sss-Sg'SrsrosloBs: 

3 E3 tf • -«T w 



2'^ 



O<o , 



0.c:o:cotJi6-io» 



1 



Games Played. 



Times at Bat of Opponents 






k CO B (0 o 

'UJOQ-l 



Runs Scored by Opponents 



— 4- (.i -' 



O. V ^~ »~ O' — 35 .t-. 



SgSj 



li ^* -o -j je E2 S to CO -u o <Z R 

c to j oo ^ ^ »- ^* i-* mo a O' 






i *o to ci *£ M to to to to ro to to *a to 

i w £ oi -1 £S *o to to £ co CO to ^i 'r> 



Average per Game. 



Number of 1st Base Hits 
made by Opponents. 



Percentage of Base Ilits 
to Times at Bat of Op- 
ponents. 



g-jCTCTCT>«cowpo;£*-cstoto«'l 
CO 5)-* CJI-.J-I «OCOOU« OO"- 1 COCO 



Number of Bases made 
by Opponents on "Called 
Balls/' 



4M °. ,4 i - r'. M i 



Average per Game. 



Scnooo'to&i'flcotcao^wo 



Number Pat Out. 



^^S^o5coc?-?S^^«cSoj- Times Assisting. 



B-^OtOOO^fta^-JOCKg-HOtO 



j- I Fielding Errors. 



H >-» »o w »-*•-* *o »—»—«-» *o »«-* * 
Se«2KifcO'-'-"-'Wi* t| -''J t O'' 



Wild Pitches . 



lM§§g|g|§Mg| I Total Chtpce °- 






Percentage of Chances 
Accepted. 



"0 

— » 

o 

a 
tfl 

» 
o 



m 




> 


a 


<n 




O 
2 


2! 


o 

Tl 


> 
r 




s 


CO 


> 


00 


CO 


• 


m 




H 




i— i 




o 




> 




r 




o 




w 




D 




W 




» 



LEAGUE CLUB AVERAGES. 



95 



o 

2 

O 

w 



Q 

2 
< 

o 

2 

t— • 

H 
H 

< 

ffl 



•i 

i 



-3 

a 
o 



8 

a. 



5> 

rt 



a 
.2 

rt 

2 
ti 



a> 

a 

o 

s 

a 



s 

OS 



d 

(3 
0) 
d 

[4 


& 



q 

H 

B 



■p»l<Ieaov laDtreqa 



•i9DOBqo ISJO.L 



•saqojid PUM 
pnp b\\vq paaggj 



•siomh 3njpt»ia 



•SnnBissv eoraii 



aang jo aamnoojaj 



•»no?n,£»qranK 



'omvQjed aSs-isAy 



■sassg i«ioj, 



CO c£ cfi ao 5 oo So 00 oo 



i-t^o^taocoosci.-* 












8t- o> m -r t- co i— 
— • l- to y h B :p 

HOOcdiooS 



•»»8»a }&n£ 



90180 J9< * a2!lI3iV 



■poioog snnji 



•}ng ■)« tarajx 



•nOAl sauiBO 



•paA"B[<j waraiiy 






* 



T»a 



O) ifl to » V LO lij K) 

w ci c-* o» o* c> 55 51 



( t- o o5 tt co co tc 



(D >Q i.O lO »Tt*t 



CO ■**• CO ..-. ~T rj 



Svwmwwco 



eo 36 8 3b 2 23 co as 









96 



LEAGUE OnAMPIOiNSIIir GAMES. 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES PLAYED ' 

DUIUNQ THE 

SEASON OF 1881. 









o 






a . 






O g 


Datb, 




1881 










.Ph 






o 






K 






1 


April 


80 


a 


" 


au 


3 


May 


2 


4 


** 


8 


5 


ii 


2 


fi 


it 


8 


7 


it 


3 


R 


" 


3 


» 


" 


a 


10 


it 


3 


11 


it 


4 


12 


u 


4 


18 




5 


14 


ii 


5 


IS 


41 


B 


16 


" 


i; 


17 




6 


18 


H 


7 


19 




7 


20 


M 


7 


81 


*' 


7 


22 


" 


;i 


23 


" 


in 


24 


Ii 


10 


25 


•' 


10 


26 


H 


in 


87 


ii 


u 


m 


ii 


ii 


29 


41 


ii 


30 


it 


ii 


31 


" 


is 


32 




IS 


S3 


it 


12 


34 


<■ 


13 


35 


" 


14 


36 


" 


11 


37 


*' 


11 


38 


if 


16 


19 


ii 


17 


40 


H 


17 


41 


14 


17 


42 


II 


18 


43 


" 


18 



Names ov Contestants 



Chicago vs. Cleveland... 
Worcester vs. Troy City. 

Detroit vs. Bnffalo 

Providence vs. Boston,... 
Chicago vs. Cleveland... 

Detroit vs. Buffalo 

Worcester vs. Troy City. 

Boston vs. Providence... 

(i (t 

Detroit vs. Buffalo 

«* u 

Boston vs. Providence. .. 
Worcester vs. Troy City. 
Cleveland vs. Chicago... 
Buffalo vs. Detroit 

Worcester vs. Troy City. 
Cleveland vs. Chicago... 
Boston vs. Prov denco... 
Cleveland vs. Chicago... 
Troy Cry vs. Chicago... 

Buffalo vs. Boston 

Detroit vs. Worcester 

Cleveland vs. Providence 

Buffalo vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. Troy City . .. 
Detroit vs. Worcester. .. 

U It 

Buffalo vs. Boston 

Cleveland vs. Providence 
Chicago vs. Troy City... 
Buffalo vs. Providence. .. 
Cleveland vs. Boston.... 
Chicago vs. Worcester.. 

Detroit vs. Troy City 

•* <( 

Boston vs. Cleveland.... 
Chicago vs. Worcester... 

Cleveland vs. Boston.... 







Kims 




Winning 


S COKED. 


"Where 






Played, 


Club. 


*ja 


no . 

= .3 






















g° 


3" 


Chicago 


Chicago.... 


8 


5 


Worcester.. 


Worcester.. 


4 





t( 


•* 


8 


B 


Detroit,... 




6 


5 


Providence 


Boston 


4 


2 


Chicago ... 


Cleveland.. 


3 


1 


M 


Chicago ... 


6 





Detroit .... 


Detroit .... 


4 


2 


Worcester.. 


Worcester. 


10 


5 


Boston 


Providence 


7 


1 


Providence 


Boston 


4 





Detroit 


Buffalo .... 


4 


2 




•' 


8 


1 


Bo-ton 


Providence 


4 


2 


Troy 


Worcester.. 


3 


2 


Cleveland.. 


Cleveland.. 


7 


3 


Buffalo.... 


Buffalo .... 


3 


2 


" 


11 


6 


1 


Troy 

Cleveland . 


Worcester.. 


8 


4 


Chicago ... 


4 





Boston 




4 


1 


Cleveland.. 


Cleveland.. 


3 


2 


Chicago.... 


Chicago-... 


10 


5 


Buffalo 




4 





Detroit 


Worcester- 


6 





Cleveland . 


Providence 


6 


4 


•• 


Cleveland . 


6 


5 


Buffalo.... 


Buffalo .... 


1 





Chicago ... 


Chicago ... 


11 


3 


Detroit .... 


Worcester.. 


S 


3 


it 


" 


10 


4 


Buffalo .... 


Boston .... 


5 





Cleveland.. 


Providenre 


8 


3 


Chicago 


Troy City.. 


6 


5 




Buffalo 


8 


4 


Cleveland.. 




6 


5 


Chicago.... 


Chicago . . . 


4 


3 


Detroit.... 


Detroit 


12 


2 


M 


** 


4 





Cleveland.. 




3 


2 


Chicago ... 


Worcester.. 


7 


1 


** 


Chicago . . 


10 


3 


Cleveland.. 


Boston 


8 


O 



LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



97 



Record of Championship Games — Continued. 



m 










RCHS 


h 

2a- 

o 

A 


DATS, 

1881. 


Names ot Contestants. 


WHinn 
Played. 


Winning 
Club. 


Soobbd. 


em 

SA 

a a 

I 5 


11 

3° 


44 


May 18 


Detroit vs. Troy City 


Detroit 


Troy City.. 


7 


% 


45 


'•' 18 


Buffalo vs. Providence... 


Buffalo .... 


Providence 


6 


5 


46 


" 19 


M '• 


|| 


|| 


11 


5 


47 


" 20 


Buffalo vs. Worcester 


** 




7 





48 


" 20 


Cleveland vs. Troy City. 


Cleveland. . 


Cleveland.. 


7 


4 


48 


« 20 




Chicago... 


Chicago. . . . 


5 


4 


50 


" 20 


Detroit vs. Providence.. 




Providence 


5 


4 


51 


" 21 


u " 


n 


Detroit 


16 





52 


" 21 


Cleveland vs. Troy City. 


Cleveland.. 


Cleveland.. 


5 


3 


53 


" 21 




Chicago ... 


Chicago ... 


4 


2 


54 


" 21 


Worcester vs. Buffalo... 


Buffalo .... 


Worcester.. 


9 


6 


55 


" 23 


Detroit vs. Providence. . . 


Detroit 


Detroit .... 


5 


2 


56 


" 24 


Buffalo vs. Worcester 


Buffalo .... 


Buffalo.... 


3 


2 


57 


" 24 


Cleveland vs. Troy City. 


Cleveland.. 


Troy City.. 


5 





58 


" 24 




Chicago.... 


Chicago. . . . 


6 


1 


59 


" 25 


Chicago vs. Providence.. 


** 


|| 


11 


6 


60 


" 25 


Cleveland vs. Worcester. 


Cleveland. . 


Cleveland.. 


7 


1 


61 


« 25 


Buffalo vs. Troy City . . . . 


Buffalo. 




8 


2 


62 


« 25 
" 26 
" 26 


Detroit vs. Boston. 


Detroit 


Detroit.... 


9 

4 
6 




2 
3 


63 

64 


Buffalo vs. Troy City.... 


Buffalo .... 


Troy City.. 


65 


" 26 


Cleveland vs. Worcester. 


Cleveland.. 


Cleveland,. 


5 


3 


66 


" 26 


Chicago vs. Providence.. 


Chicago 


Chicago.... 


12 


5 


67 


" 27 


•i " •. 


'* 


Providence 


8 


2 


68 


" 27 




Detroit.... 


Detroit .... 


11 


2 


eg 


" 28 


Cleveland vs. Worcester 


Cleveland.. 


Cleveland.. 


11 


1 


70 


" 28 


Buffalo vs. Troy City.... 


Buffalo .... 


Troy City.. 


5 


4 


71 


" 30 


Boston vs. Cleveland.... 


BOBton 


Boston .... 


8 


4 


72 


" SO 


Worcester vs. Detroit... 


Worcester.. 


Worcester.. 


8 


4 


73 


" 30 


Providence vs. Buffalo. . . 


Providence 


Buffalo .... 


3 


2 


74 


•' 30 


Troy City vs. Chicago .. . 


Troy 


Chicago.... 
Troy City.. 


4 


3 


75 


Jane 1 


a a 


•i 


5 


4 


76 


" 1 


Boston vs. Cleveland 


Boston 


Cleveland.. 


7 


1 


77 


" 1 


Worcester vs. Detroit... 


Worcester.. 


Detroit.... 


10 


3 


78 


1 


Providence vs. Buffalo. . . 


Providence 


Providence 


7 


5 


79 


" 2 


II u 


I* 


Buffalo 


8 


7 


80 


'• 2 


Boston vs. Cleveland.... 


Boston 


Cleveland.. 


6 


1 


81 


" 2 


Troy City vs. Chicago. . . 




Troy City.. 


2 




1 


82 


2 


Worcester vs. Detroit.... 


Worcester.. 


Detroit .... 


6 


83 


" 4 


Worcester vs. Chicago.. 


|| 


Chicago — 


6 


1 


84 


" 4 






Buffalo 


6 


3 


85 


" 6 


Providence vs. Cleveland 


Providence 


Cleveland.. 


4 





86 


" 6 


Troy City va. Detroit.... 


Troy 


Detroit ... 


2 




1 


87 


« 7 


Worcester vs. Chicago. .. 
Providence vs. Cleveland 


Worcester.. 


Chicago.... 
Providence 


13 


88 


" 7 


Providence 


3 


1 
2 




89 


M 1 




Boston 


Buffalo.... 


3 


90 
91 


" 8 

" 9 


Troy City vs. Detroit 

(i »i 




Troy City.. 
Detroit 


3 
1 


92 


« 9 




Boston 


Buffalo.... 


1 





93 


ii ' g 


Worcester vs. Chicago... 


Worcester.. 


Worcester- 


7 


6 


94 


9 


Providence vs. Cleveland 


Providence 


Providence 


6 2 



LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



; r 



Record of Championship Games — Continued. 



co 












Runs 


Itj 


Date, 

1881. 


Names or Constants. 


Whebi 
Plated. 


Winning 

Club. 


Scobed. 




M 

3jS 


tit . 


°s 












a a 


'• =■ 


O 












I 5 


.s 3 


95 


June 


13 


Providence vs. Chicago. . 


it 


Chicago 


12 


5 


96 


" 


13 


Worcester vs. Buffalo 


Worcester.. 


Buffalo .... 


10 


9 


97 


M 


13 


Troy City vh. Cleveland.. 


Troy 


Troy City. . 


3 


2 


68 


" 


13 




Boston .... 


Detroit.... 


2 





99 


n 


14 


ii it 


n 


Boston .... 


10 


9 


100 


ii 


15 


it tt 


ii 


it 


7 


1 


101 


M 


15 


Troy City vs. Cleveland. 


Albany 

Providence 


Cleveland.. 


7 


3 


103 


ii 


15 


Providence vs. Chicago.. 


Chicago.,.. 


18 


1 


103 


H 


15 


Worcester vs. Bull'alo 


Worcester.. 


Buffalo 


4 


3 


104 


(f 


U 


ti ii 


|| 


Worcester.. 


15 


4 


105 


K 


16 


Providence vs. Chicago. 


Providence 


Chicago 

Troy City.. 


8 


4 


106 


'* 


16 


Troy City vs. Cleveland. 




3 


1 


107 


II 


17 


Troy City vs. Buffalo 


" 


ti 


o 





108 


II 


17 


Worcester vs. Cleveland. 


Worcester.. 


Worcester.. 


5 


2 


109 


ti 


17 


Providence vs. Detroit... 


Providen e 


Providence 


5 





110 


II 


17 






Boston 


b 


3 


111 


ii 


18 


ii ti 


•I 


Chicago.... 


5 


1 


112 


11 


18 


Worcester vs. Cleveland. 


Worcester.. 


Worcester.. 


5 





113 


II 


18 


Providence vs. Detroit. . . 


Providence 


Detroit . .. 


10 


8 


114 


II 


20 


it " 


it 


it 


2 


1 


115 


II 


20 


Troy City vs. Buffalo 




Troy City.. 


6 


2 


116 


II 


21 






Chicago.... 


8 


% 


117 


41 


21 


Worcester vs. Cleveland. 


Worcester.. 


Worcester.. 


7 


5 


118 


II 


21 


Troy City vs. Buffalo.... 




Troy City.. 


8 


7 


119 


it 


24 


Detroit vs. Troy City.... 


Detroit ... 


•i 


9 


8 


120 


Ii 


24 


Buffalo vs. Worcester.... 


Buffalo, 


Buffalo .... 


4 


2 


121 


ii 


24 


Cleveland vs. Boston 


Cleveland.. 


Boston 


4 


3 


122 


ii 


24 


Chicago vs. Providence.. 


Chicago 


Chicago 


8 





123 


It 


25 


ii <t 


'• 


** 


12 


8 


124 


ii 


as 


Buffalo vs. Worcester ... 




Worcester.. 


9 


4 


125 


ii 


25 


Cleveland vs. Boston 


Cleveland.. 


Cleveland.. 


6 


2 


126 


11 


27 


it .i 


• 




10 


9 


127 


ii 


27 


Chicago vs. Providence. 
Detroit vs. Troy City.. .. 


Chicago.... 


Chicago . .. 


19 


12 


124 


*• 


m 


Detroit .... 


Detroit.... 


8 





129 


H 


(8 


it it 


it 


Troy City.. 


6 


1 


130 


1* 


29 


Detroit vs. Providence... 


|| 


Providence 


10 


5 


131 


II 


29 






Buffalo. 


16 


10 


132 


«l 


2S 


Cleveland vs. Worcester. 


Cleveland.. 


Cleveland.. 


5 


3 


133 


l( 


29 


Chicago ve. Troy City. . . 


Chicago ... 


Chicago ... 


8 





134 


II 


B0 


ti ii 


ii 


it 


4 


2 


135 


II 


so 


Cleveland vs. Worcester. 


Cleveland.. 


Worcester.. 


6 


1 


136 


II 


30 






Bnffalo 


7 


4 


137 


11 


30 


Detroit vs. Providence. . . 


Detroit.... 


Providence 


7 


8 


138 


July 


2 


it it 


" 


" 


7 


b 


139 


** 


2 


Cleveland vs. Worcester. 


Cleveland.. 


Cleveland.. 


4 





140 


» 


3 


Chicago v». Troy City... 


Chicago.... 


Chicago . .. 


10 


5 


141 


** 


2 




Buffalo 


Buffalo 


7 


4 


142 


M 


4 


Cleveland vs. Providence 


Cleveland.. 


Cleveland.. 


9 


3 


143 


U 


4 




Chicago.... 




IS 


12 


144 


If 


4 


Buffalo vs. Troy City 




Troy City.. 


8 


3 


145 


M 


4 


W It 


M 


it 


12 






LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



Record of Championship Games — Continued. 



DAT*, 

1881. 



July 



NAKES Or C0NT*STANT8. 



12 

la 
12 
13 
13 
13 
13 
14 
16 
it; 
16 
16 
18 
19 
19 
18 
20 
20 
20 
20 

22 
22 
22 
23 
23 
28 
26 
26 

28 
IB 
28 
28 
28 
\29 
29 
'."J 

at 



Detroit vs. Worcester. . . 



Chicago vs. BoBton 

Cleveland vs. Providence 
Buffalo vs. Troy City. . . . 
Cleveland vs. Providence 

Chicago vs. Boston 

Detroit vs. Worcester — 
Chicago vs. Worcester... 
Buffalo vs. Providence... 
Cleveland vs. Troy City. . 

Detroit vs . Boston 

Cleveland vs. Troy City. 

Chicago vs. Worcester.. 

Buffalo vs. Providence... 

if *( 

Chicago vs. Worcester... 
Cleveland vs. Troy City. 
Detroit vs. Boston 



Cleveland vs. Detroit 

Providence vs. Worcester 
Troy City vs. Boston.... 

Buffalo vs. Chicago 

Troy City vs. Boston 

Worcester vs. Providence 
Cleveland vs. Detroit — 

Buffalo vs. Chicago 

«t *' 

Clevelandvs. Detroit.... 
Troy City vs. Boston — 
Providence vs.Worcester 
Troy City vs. Providence 
Buffalo vs. Cleveland.... 
Worcester vs. Boston — 
Detroit vs. Chicago 



Boston vs. Worcester . .. 
Buffalo vs. Cleveland — 
Troy City vs . Providence 

Detroit vs. Chicago 

Worcester vs. Boston — 
Worcester vs. Providence 
Boston vs. Troy City .... 
Chicago vs. Cleveland. .. 
Detroit, vs. Buffalo 



Boston vs. Troy City.... 
i Providence vs. Worcester 
IChlcago vs. Cleveland. .. 



Where 
Played. 



Detroit ... 

Chicago.... 
Cleveland.. 

Buffalo 

Cleveland.. 
Chicago.... 
Detroit.... 
Chicago .. . 

Buffalo 

Cleveland.. 
Detroit.... 
Cleveland.. 
Chicago... . 
Buffalo .... 

Chicago 

Cleveland.. 
Detroit 

IS 

Cleveland.. 
Providence 

Troy 

Buffalo 

Troy 

Worcester.. 
Cleveland.. 
Buffalo 

Cleveland.. 

Troy 

Providence 

Troy 

Buffalo 

Worcester- 
Detroit.... 

Boston 

Buffalo 

Troy 

H 

Detroit 

Worcester.. 

Boston .... 
Chicago ... 
Detroit.... 



Boston 

Providence 
Chicago ... 



Winninb 

Club. 



Detroit 

Chicago 

Providence' 

Buffalo 

Providence 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Chicago . .. 
Buffalo.... 
Cleveland.. 
Detroit.... 
Troy City.. 
Chicago.... 
Buffalo .... 
Providence 
Chicago.,.. 
Cleveland.. 

Detroit 

Boston .... 

Detroit 

Worcester.. 
Troy City.. 
Buffalo.... 
Troy City.. 
Worcester.. 
Cleveland.. 
Buffalo .... 
it 

Detroit.... 

Boston 

Worcester- 
Troy City.. 
Cleveland . 

Boston 

Detroit.... 
u 

Boston — 
Cleveland . 
Providence 

Chicago.... 
Worcester- 
Providence 

Boston 

Cleveland . 

Buffalo 

Detroit .... 

Boston! 

Providence 
Cleveland.. 



Runs 
Scored. 



•36 






100 



LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



Kkcoed of Championship Games — Continued. 



?g 



197 
198 
199 
200 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
215 
216 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 
226 
227 
228 
229 
230 
231 
232 
233 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
240 
241 
242 
243 
244 
245 
246 
247 



July 



Aug. 



Datb, 

1881. 



NiMH oi Contestants. 



Chicago vs. Cleveland... 
Worcester vs. Providence 

Detroit vs. Buffalo 

Boston vs. Troy City. . . 
Providence vs. Troy City 

Chicago vs. Buffalo 

Detroit vs. Cleveland . .. 

Boston vs. Worcester 

Providence vs. Troy City 

Worcester vs. Boston.... 

Chicago vs. Buffalo 

Detroit vs, Cleveland.... 

Boston vs. Worcester... 
Providence vs. Troy City 

Chicago vs. Buffalo 

Providence vs. Boston. .. 

Chicago vs. Detroit 

Cleveland vs. Buffalo.... 
Worcester vs. Troy City. 

Providence vs. Boston. .. 
Boston vs. Providence... 

Chicago vs. Detroit 

Cleveland vs. Buffalo.... 
it c( 

Worcester vs. Troy City 
Providence vs. Boston... 

Chicago vs. Detroit 

Boston vs. Troy City. ... . 

Providence vs. Worcester 
Cleveland vs. Detroit. ... 
Chicago vs. Buffalo 

Cleveland vs. Detroit.... 

Boston vs. Troy City 

Worcester vs. Providence 
Cleveland vs. Detroit.. .. 

Chicago vs. Buffalo 

Chicago vs. Detroit 

Cleveland vs. Buffalo 

Providence vs. Troy City 
Worcester vs. Boston... 
Providence vs. Troy City 

Chicago vs. Detroit 

Worcester vs. Boston.... 
Cleveland vs. Buffalo ... 
Worcester vs. Boston... 
Chicago vs. Detroit 



WllEltE 

Played. 



Chicago ... 
Worcester.. 
Detroit .... 

Boston 

Providence 
Chicago.... 

Detroit 

Boston 

Providence 

Worcester.. 
Chicago.... 
Detroit 



Boston 

Providence 

Chicago . . . 

Providence 

Chicago 

Cleveland.. 

Worcester.. 
•i 

Providence 

Boston 

Chicago.... 
Cleveland. . 



Worcester.. 
Providence 
Chicago.... 
Boston .... 

Providence 
Cleveland.. 
Chicago 

Cleveland.. 
Boston .... 
Worcester.. 
Cleveland.. 
Chicago 

H 

Cleveland.. 
Providence 
Worcester.. 
Providence 
Chicago . . . 
Worcester.. 
Cleveland.. 
Worcester.. 
Chicago 



WnntiNo 
Club. 



Chicago ... 
Providence 
Detroit .... 

Boston 

Providence 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Boston 

Troy City.. 

Boston ... 

Chicago 

Detroit .... 
Cleveland.. 
Boston .. . 
Providence 
Chicago ... 

Boston 

Chicago ... 

Buffalo 

Troy City.. 
Worcester.. 
BoBton .... 
Providence 
Chicago ... 
Buffalo 



Worcester.. 
Providence 
Detroit .... 
Boston .... 
Troy City.. 
Providence 
Cleveland.. 
Chicago 

Cleveland, . 
Boston . . . 
Providence 
Detroit.... 
Buffalo .... 

Chicago 

Cleveland.. 
Troy City.. 
Worcester.. 
Providence 
Chicago.... 
Boston .... 

Buffalo 

Boston 

Detroit 



Ktras 
Scored. 



LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMEB. 



101 





RECORD 


op Championship 


Games.- 


—Continued 




m 












liUNS 


. 


Date, 

18S1. 


Names or Contestants. 


Whbrh 
Playid. 


WINNING 

Club. 


Scored. 


OR 


Iff 


is 


o 












5 


S3 


248 


Aug. 


SE 


Cleveland vs. Buffalo.. . . 


Cleveland. . 


Cleveland. . 


3 


249 




27 


Providence vs. Worcester 


Providence 


Providence 


8 


1 


250 


M 


27 


Buffalo vs. Cleveland 




Cleveland. . 


5 


4 


251 


II 


27 




Detroit 


Detroit..... 


9 


1 


2.12 


II 


28 


Troy City vs. Boston 


Troy,. 


Troy City.. 


B 


4 


253 


II 


211 


Providence vs. Worcester 


Providence 


Providence 


1?. 


n 


2M 


It 


2!) 


Buffalo vs. Cleveland — 


Buffalo 


Buffalo .... 


A 


s 


255 


II 


80 


ii ii 


" 


'* 


7 


B 


256 


II 


86 






Troy City.. 


9 


a 


257 


II 


80 


Providence vs. Worcester 


Providence. 


Providence 


10 


8 


258 


II 


80 






Chicago.. .. 


12 


8 


259 


II 


81 




L< 


'i 


10 


3 


2ft0 


II 


81 


Providence vs. Worcester 


Providence 


Providence 


12 


7 


Ml 


II 


81 




Troy 


Boston. 


12 


A 


262 


11 


81 








8 


B 


863 


Sept. 


2 


Buffalo vs. Detroit 


" 


ii 


14 


e 


264 


2 


Cleveland vs. Chicago . . . 


Cleveland. . 


Cleveland.. 


4 


1 


265 


ii 


2 


Troy City vs. Providence. 




Troy City.. 


4 


8 


266 


it 


ft 


Boston vs. Worcester. . . 




Boston ... 


3 


2 


267 


u 


8 


Troy City vs. Providence 




Providence 


11 


1 


268 


•• 


8 


Cleveland vs. Chicago.... 


Cleveland.. 


Chicago .. . 


4 


2 


269 


II 


8 


Buffalo vs. Detroit 


Buffalo 


Buffalo 


B 


3 


270 


II 


B 


ii ii 


M 


ii 


6 


8 


271 


II 


B 


Boston vs. Worcester — 




Worcester.. 


9 


2 


272 


11 


B 


Troy City vs. Providence 


Troy 


Troy City.. 


6 


8 


273 


11 


& 


Cleveland vs. Chicago... 


Cleveland.. 


Chicago 


14 


8 


274 


•1 


7 


Boston vs. Providence. .. 


Boston 


Providence 


B 


8 


275 


II 


7 


Troy City vs. Worcester. 




Troy City. . 


14 


B 


276 


II 


7 


Detroit vs. Cleveland 


Detroit 


Detroit 


6 


a 


277 


II 


8 


ii it 


ii 


Cleveland. . 


6 


8 


278 


II 


8 


Providence vs. Boston... 


Providence 


Providence 


7 





279 


II 


8 


Troy City vs. Worcester. 




Troy City.. 
Buffalo 


12 


5 


280 


11 


8 




10 


1 


281 


II 


9 




|* 


Chicago.... 


4 


1 


282 


II 


9 


Troy City vs. Worcester. 




Worcester.. 


7 


4 


283 


n 


9 


Detroit vs. Cleveland. ... 


Detroit 


Detroit.... 


6 


4 


284 


ii 


10 


Troy City vs. Worcester.. 




Troy City.. 


8 


7 


IMS 


ti 


m 


Boston vs. Providence... 


Boston 


Providence 


8 





2R6 


ii 


10 




Buffalo 


Chicago ... 


11 


1 


287 


ii 


18 


Boston vs. Chicago 


Boston .... 


ii 


3 


1 


288 


ii 


18 


Worcester vs. Buffalo. . . . 


Worcester . 


Worcester . 


10 


8 


280 


ii 


1?, 


Providence vs. Detroit . . . 


Providence. 


Providence 


6 


5 


290 


<i 


18 


Troy City vs. Cleveland . . 


Troy 


Troy City.. 


7 


8 


291 


ii 


14 




" 


€i 


8 





tw. 


M 


14 






Chicago.... 
Providence 


4 


3 


W3 


II 


14 


Providence vs. Detroit .. 


Providence 


4 


1 


7W 


•1 


14 


Worcester vs. Buffalo.... 


Worcester . 


Buffalo .... 


2 


1 


TVi 


II 


T. 


ii ii 


ii 


Worcester . 


7 


6 


V90 


M 


15 


Providence vs. Detroit. .. 


Providence 


Providence 


12 


8 


T97 


li 


16 


Boston vs. Chicago 


Boston 


Chicago. . 


4 





298 


•I 


n; 


Troy City vs. Cleveland.. 




Cleveland.. 


10 


7 






102 



LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 





.Record op Championship Games- 


—Continued. 




m 












Buns 


a . 


Datb, 

1881. 


Namis of Contestants. 


Wheru 
Platbd. 


WraNiNO 
Club. 


Scouxd. 


v-. rt 

Or- 


u 

a a 


no 


O 












.as 


I 3 


299 


Sept. 


17 


Providence vs. Chicago.. 


Providence 


Providence 


3 


1 


300 


" 


17 








6 




am 


ii 


17 


Worcester vs. Cleveland 


Worcester.. 


Worcester- 


7 


2 


302 
803 
304 


ii 


19 
20 
20 


Troy City vs. Buffalo 


Troy 


Troy City.. 


7 
17 
8 


5 


a 




Boston 


Detroit — 


1 


305 


ii 


20 


ti it 


ti 


" 


9 


4 


SOfi 


ii 


20 


Worcester vs. Cleveland. 


Worcester.. 


Cleveland . 


6 


& 


307 


«i 


21 


it it 


ii 


ii 


11 


4 


308 


<• 


2! 


Providence vs. Chicago. 


Providence 


Providence 


8 


5 


309 


•i 


21 


TroyCi'yvs. Buffalo 


Troy 


Buffalo.... 


10 


4 


310 


*♦ 


22 


Providence vs. Chicago, 


Providence 


Chicago ... 


2 


1 


311 


ii 


23 


Providence vs. Cleveland 


ii 


Providence 


8 


4 


312 


ii 


23 


Troy City vs. Chicago... 


Troy 


Chicago ... 


8 


2 


313 


*i 


2:1 


Worcester vs. Detroit... 


Worcester- 


Worcester- 


12 


6 


314 


ii 


23 




Boston .... 




4 


8 


315 


ii 


24 


ii H 


" 


it 





2 


31 fi 


it 


21 


Worcester vs. Detroit... 


Worcester. 


Detroit 


8 


8 


317 


it 


24 


Providence vs. Cleveland 


Providence 


Providence 


12 


10 


318 


i« 


26 


Troy City vs. Chicago... 


Troy 


Troy City- 
Buffalo .... 


8 


1 


319 


ii 


27 




Boston 


3 


2 


320 


ii 


27 


Providence vs. Cleveland 


Piovidence 


Providence 


6 





321 


ii 


27 


Worcester vs. Detroit... 


Worcester- 


Detroit 


11 


8 


3381 


ii 


27 


Troy City vs. Chicago. . . 




Chicago.... 


10 


8 


323 


it 


28 


Troy City vs. Detroit. . . . 




Troy City.. 


4 


2 


334 


ii 


28 


Boston vs. Cleveland 


Boston 


Boston 


10 


3 


325 


ii 


2S Providence vb. Buffalo.. . 


Providen c 


Buffalo .... 


7 


3 


326 


ii 


28 


Worcester vs. Chicago... 


Worcester. . 


Chicago .. . 


7 


6 


3' '7 


ii 


29 


it i* 


t* 


Worcester- 


12 


4 


<t,?8 


ti 


29 


Boston vs. Cleveland.... 




Cleveland . 


4 


8 


329 


ii 


29 


Troy City vs. Detroit 




Detroit 


4 


8 


3.10 


ii 


29 


Buffalo vs. Providence. .. 


Providence 




u 


8 


Ill 


*i 


80 


it it 


•' 


Providence 


10 


1 


332 


ii 


SO 


Troy City vs. Detroit 


Troy 


Detroit 


7 





333 


it 


BO 


Worcester vs. Chicago.. 


Worcester- 


Chicago . . 


11 


4 


334 


it 


30 


Boston vs. Cleveland... 


Boston 




t 


3 






1047 



Total Number of Buns Scored, 3,398. 



SCORED BY CLUBS. 

Opponents, 



RUNS 

Chicago 550 

Providence 439 

Buffalo 440 

Detroit «9 

Troy City 393 

Boston 349 

Cleveland "M 

Worcester 4 »2 

3398 



379 
418 
447 
429 
423 
410 
408 
484 
3398 



Average number of runs scored per game by winning clubs 7.03 

Average number of runs scored per gams by losing clubs 3.13 



m&m, m&l&i uniforms. 

Outfitters to the National League. 




Our facilities for manu- 
facturing Base Ball, Crick- 
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kinds of athletic uniforms 
are greatly increased. 

Having been awarded 
the contract for furnishing 
all the league clubs with 
their complete outfit, we 
have been enabled to con- 
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and special styles of flannel 
not possessed by any other 
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department is under the 
supervision of a practical 
tailor and shirt cutter who 
has been in our employ for 
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an expert in designing and 
cutting of base ball and ath- 
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urge clubs not to make the 
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work is necessarily small, 
but send direct to us and 
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Send 10 cents for samples 
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different styles and prices. 
Address, 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

108 Madison St., Chicago, I1L 



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E 



<i 



Our Worsted Web Belts are made of the best imported English webbing, 
aH inches wide, with russet leather finish and fancy buckles, and made any 
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now in stock the following styles: 

Per doz. Each. 
League Regulation Belt, made of webbing covered with 
flannel and has a large nickel plated buckle which 

takes in the full width.- of the belt $15 00 $1 50 

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No. a — Solid Blue 6 00 '50 

No. 3 — Solid Red 6 00 50 

No. 4 — Solid Green 6 00 50 

No. 5 — Solid Brown 600 50 

No. 6 — Red, White, and Blue 6 00 50 

No. 7— White Center, Blue Edges 600 So 

No. 8 — White Center, Red Edges 6 00 50 

No. 9— White Center, Brown Edges 600 50 

No. 10 — White Center, Green Edges 6 00 50 

No. 11— Blue Center, White Edges 600 50 

No. 12 — Red Center, White Edges 6 00 50 

Captain's Belt, White, Blue Edges 1a 00 1 00 

11 " '* Red Edges 12 00 I 00 

Any of the above style of Belts made with large 2 x /% inch Nickel Plated 
Buckle, at $6.00 per dozen extra. 

AMERICAN WEB BEETS. 

Per doz. Bach. 

No. 14. — Red, with White Edges $3 00 % 30 

No. 15— Blue, " " 300 30 

Sample Belt by mail, postpaid, on receipt of price. 



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Per dot. 
League Regulation, made of finest worsted yarn in the following' 
colors, Eight Blue, Navy Blue, Scarlet, Gray, Green, Old 

Gold, Brown $iS 00 

No. XX— Extra Quality Fine Woolen Stockings, Scarlet, Blue, 

B rown, or Green 1 5 00 

No. I— Fine Quality Woolen Stockings, Scarlet, Blue, or Brown... 19 00 
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BASE, BALL GAPS, 



For description and prices see adjoining page. 




College Cap, No. 21. Tennis or Cricket Cap, No. 23. 

A. G. SPALDING & BEOS., Manufacturers, Chicago. 



BASE BALL CAPS AND HATS. 



lit. q u'il. 2d , qufcl. 3d ^—L 

No. i— League Regulation Cap, see page 12 of our 

fashion plate $13 00 

No. 3 — Base Ball Hats, any color, see page 9 of our 

fashion plate, also adjoining page 18 00 15 00 .... 

No. 5— Base Ball Caps, Chicago style, any color, 

with or without stripes, see page 1 1 of fashion 

plate, also adjoining page ..» 900 

No. 7 — Base Ball Caps, Boston shape, without star, 

any colors, see page 10 of fashion plate, also 

adjoining page ; 9 00 7 50 .... 

No. 7— Ditto, all White only 900 7 50 600 

No. 11 — Base Ball Cap, Jockey shape, any color, see 

page 12 of fashion plate, also adjoining page. 9 00 7 50 .... 

No. 11— Ditto, all white only 900 7 50 600 

No. 15 — Base Ball Cap, Boston shape, with star, see 

page iooffashion plate, alsoadjoining plate. 9 00 7 50 
No, 15— Base Ball Cap, Boston shape, white only. . . 9 00 7 50 6 00 

No. 19 — Base Ball Skull Cap any color, see page 12. .. 900 750 

No. 19 — Ditto, white only 9 00' 7 50 6 00 

No. 21 — College Base Ball Caps, any color, seepage 11 9 00 7 50 .... 

No. 21 — Ditto, white only 9 00 7 50 6 00 

! In addition to the styles above mentioned we are prepared to make any 
style of cap known, and will furnish at prices corresponding to above. 

BASE BALL SHOES. 




No. 1— League Club Shoe, same as used by Leaj^ue Clubs, made of 
the best calf skin. The standard screw fastener is used. Trice 
per pair j oo 

No. 2— Chicago Club Shoe. Extra quality canvas foxed with French 

calf. The standard screw fastener is used. Price per pair... 400 

No. 3— Amateur or Practice Shoe. Good quality canvas. Strap over 

instep. Price per pair 3 09 

No. 4 -Oxford Tie Base Ball Shoe. Same as Amateur, only low cut 

Price per pair 2 00 



SPALDING'S IMPROVED LEAGUfc 

CATC HERS' MASK. 

After much experiment we have finally 
perfected a safe arid comfortable catchers' 
mask or face protector, and can recommend 
It to base ball catchers as the strongest, light- 
est and most comfortable-feeling mask yet 
Invented. It Is made of the best material, 
None Genuine with- we ll padded, and by an ingenious arrange- 

out our Trade-Mark -—^-i-^r+u. j . . ■ . & . 

on each Mask. Be- men } of the wires . a " unobstructed view Is 
ware of cheap imita- obtained. It is far superior to the old style 
tions. of wire mask or the heavy, dangerous steel 

bar mask. We make them in two sizes as follows: 

No. I For a Medium Length Face, each $3-°o 

No. 2 " Long Face, » 3.00 

Mailed postpaid upon receipt rf price. 





CATCHERS' 

GLOVES 



Our new design, 

open back, catchers' 

gloves, made out of 

very thick buckskin, 

and padded, is the best 

protection for catch- 

ers'hands of anything 

yet devised. They do 

not Interfere with throwing, and no catcher or player subject to 

sore hands, should be without a pair of these gloves. 

No. 1.— Extra Heavy Genuine Indian-Tanned 

Buck, open back, well padded, warranted.. 82.00 

No. iS.— Second quality, open backs, padded. 1.50 

No. 3.— Third quality, plain backs, padded LOO 

WIRE JACK STRAPS, FOR BASE BALL CATCHERS OR WICKET KEEPERS. 

A Wire Protection or Mask to prevent painful injuries '.0 catchers. Tha 

Best Thing of the Kind Yet Invented, Used by all Lwgue Catchers. 1 

Price complete by mail, ...»,• S5-00 



SPALDING'S SCORE BOOK. 

Spalding's new design Pocket and Club Score Book continues to be the 
popular score book, and is used by all the leading- scorers and base ball 
reporters. They are adapted for the spectator of ball games, who scores for 
his own amusement, as well as the official club scorer, who records the 
minutest detail. By this new system, the art of scoring can be acquired in 
a single game. 

Full instructions, with the latest League rules, accompany each book. 



WHAT AUTHORITIES SAY OF IT. 



Ill 



Messrs. A. G. Spalding A Bros., Chicago, HI. 

Gentlemen: — I hare carefully examined the Spalding Score Book, 
and, without any hesitation, I cheerfully recommend it as the most complete 
tftlcxn of scoring of which I have any knowledge. 
Respectfully, 
N. K. YOUNG, Official Scorer Nat'l League P.B.B. Clubs. 



The new system of score books just issued by A. G. Spalding & Bros, of 
Chicago, are the neatest thing of the kind we ever saw. Every lover of the 
game should have one. They are simple in their construction and are easily 
understood. — Cincinnati Enquirer, 

The Tiubuni has received from A. G. Spalding & Bros. 10S Madison 
Street, a copy of their new score book for use this year. The book or system 
is to tar in advance of anything ever before brought out in the way of sim- 
plicity, convenience and accuracy, that it seems wonderful that it was not 
thought of years ago. The new style will be in universal use before the sea- 
son is half through.— Chicago Tribune. 

A, G. Spalding, Captain of the Chicago 'White Stockings, has just brought 
out a new score nook, which will meet with the unqualified endorsement of 
everybody who has ever undertaken to score a game of base ball . They are of 
various sizes, to meet the requirements both ofthe spectator who scores simply 
for his own satisfaction, ana for official scores of clubs. The novel and com- 
mending feature of the book is the manner in which each of the squares 
opposite the name ofthe player is utilized by a division which originated with 
Mr, Spalding. Each of these squares is divided inio five spaces by a diamond 
in its center, from the points of which lines extend to each ofthe four sides oi 
the square. Each of these spaces is designed for the use of the scorer accord • 
ing to marks and signs given in the book. By thus dividing the squares into 
spaces he scores without the liability to make mistakes. The League rules of 
scoring are printed in the book. — N. T. Clipper. 

PBICES: 

POCKET. 

KAca. 

No. l. Paper Cover, 7 games $.10 

No. 3. Bnard Cover, as games ........ .25 

No. 3. Board Cover, 46 games .50 

Score Cards *S 

CLUB BOOKS. 

No. 4. Large Size, 30 games $1.00 

No. 5. Large " 60 games... 1.7s 

N0.6. Large " 00 games *.fp 

No. 7. Large " no games 3.00 

Mailed upon receipt of price. 
Address, A. «. SPALDING A 11UOM, Pnhl 1h h era, 

108 Hidiion Street, CHICAGO, ILL 



HOW TO ORDER GOODS PROM A DISTANCE. 



HOW TO ORDER.-Part.es will save expense of return Express charges 
by sending money with order— either in Draft, Post Office Order or Registered 
Letter. When money accompanies the order we are enabled to send roods 
the cheapest way-either by mail express or freight, according to bulk of 
the article; but without cash in advance, we invariably -jend goods C. O. D., 
with the expense of return charges added. Cash smst be sent with all 
orders for goods amounting to lest than three dollars 

To insure prompt Wiling of orders, parties residing a long distance from 
Chicago, in ordering goods sent C. O. D., must inclose part of the amount 
ordered. Many people, with the best intentions, order goods from a dealer 
C. O. D., and upon receipt of them have either changed^ their mind, or lack 
the cash to take them out of the express office, and to protect ourselves under 
these circumstances, we must ask our customers to send part of the amount 
with the order — or, still better, send the cash with the order, and we will 
guarantee you satisfaction or return the money. 

SPORTING PUBLICATIONS. 

Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide for iSSa « I0 

Spalding's Official Croquet Manual " .**,".*///, "* \t 

Spalding's Manual of Boxing, Club Swinging, etc. "!.'!!!!!!!!" t< 

American Archery Register, Paper Cover •••*■ • l* • •*• .*.*"** >5 

American Archery Register, Cloth Cover !""]".'!." Co 

Rugby Foot Ball Rules '. ".".".. .1.1! *.".".*. IC, 

Lawn Tennis, Book of Rules, American .*.*.".".!.....*..** 15 

Lawn Tennis, Book of Rules, English ".".. 25 

Wheelwright's Book on Indian Clubs ....".... 35 

The English ArChery Register x g 

The Witchery of Archery 1 50 

Hansard's English Book on Archery 3 00 

Ford's Book on Archery 1 50 

The Modern Gymnast 50 

The Modern Fencer 50 

Sailing, Rowing and Yachting , 35 

Athletic Sports for Boys 75 

The Athlete's Guide 50 

Pedestrianism, Running and Jumping 15 

The Science of Self- Defence 1 75 

Boxing Made Easy 10 

Kehoe's Book on Indian Clubs I 00 

Easy Method of Clog Dancing 35 

Make up Book 50 

Cricket Manual 75 

Archery Book of Rules >5 

guoits and Bowls ajj 

umb Bells and Indian Club Book, Cloth »5 

Practical Training C,o 

Ed. James' Manual of Sporting Rules 5° 

The Modern Oarsman 5° 

Angling, or How to Angle and Where to Go *° 

Fishing; a Small Hand Book of Hints to Anglers *S 

Fly Fishing and Worm Fishing for Salmon, Trout and Grayling 5° 

The Art of Swimming. By Capt. Webb So 

The Modern Pocket Hoyle, 3SS pages, Paper Cover S° 

The Modern Pocket Hoyle. 3S8 pages, Board Cover 75 

Hoyle's Games, Paper Cover 5° 

Hoyle's Games, Board Cover „ 75 

The Complete Poker Player, 14s pages, Paper Cover SO 

Mailed upon receipt of price, 

A. €r. ttl'AJLOINCr * BBOB., 

108 Madison Strict, CHICAGO Jin. 






\, 



'■i,:i 



TRADI-MARKID BATS. 



No. 



No. 



These celebrated bats were first introduced in 1S77 and they 
have gradually grown into popularity until now they are used al- 
most exclusively by all prominent professional and amateur play- 
ers. All the timber used in thew bats is allowed to season from 
one to two years, in the sun before being- made up t and the result 
is we are enabled to make much lighter and stronger bats than 
where the timber is hastily ** kiln-dried," as done py nearly all 
manufacturers of cheap goods. Kach bat is turned by hand, after 
the most approved and varied models, and if found to answer the 
requirements as to weight, size, length, etc., the trade-mark is 
stamped on each bat to insure its genuineness. We point with 
much pride to the hanesome testimonials given these bats by the 
leading batters of the country, as printed on the adjoining page. 

X»3FLX CE £>: 

Retail. Per Dm. 
each. Net. 

-Spalding's Trade-Marked Ash Bat made 
on different models finished with two coats of 
the best orange shellac, and highly polished. 35c 
2 — Spalding's Trade-Marked Cherry Bat, 

similar in style and finish to the ash 35c. 

No, 3 — Spalding's Trade-Marked Basswood 
Bat, light weight, clear, white selected tim- 
ber, polished 25c. 

No. 4 — Spalding's Trade-Marked Willow Bat, 
light weight, large handles, highly polished, 
and each bat encased in a strong paper bag; 
the best light wood bat made 50c. 

No. 5— Spalding's Boy's Fancy Bat, ash and bass- 
wood, 30 to 34 in. painted black handles, with 
three fancy colored bands 20c. 

PLAIN FINISHED BATS. 

No. 6 — Men's ash bats, plain finish, 36 to 40 in 20c. 

No. 7— Men's bass " " " " " ijc. 

No. 8 — Bov's ash " " " 28 to 34 in 10c. 

No. 9— Boy's bass " " " " " 10c. 

FANCY BATS. 

No. 10— Cherry Bats, oiled, selected timber 25c. 

No. 11 — Ash Bats, one-half polished 30c. 

No. rz — Bass M " •* 30c. 

No. 13— Ash Bats, full polished 50c. 

No. 14 — Bass *' " '* 50c. 

No. 15 — Ash bats, wound handles, plain 50c. 

No. 16 — Bass *' " " " 50c. 

No. 17 — Ash bats, wound handles, highly polished. . f>oc. 

No. 18— Bass *« " " " " .. 60c. 

For the convenience of clubs at a distance we put up what we call "Spald- 
ing's Club Assortmentof Trade-marked Bats," consisting of one dozen ash, 
one dozen Bass, half-dozen Cherry and three-quarter dozen Willow, assorted 

models and lengths, specially selected for this purpose. Price $10.00 

Save express charges by sending money with order, that we may send 
by freight. 

A. Gk SPALDING- & BROS., 



$300 



300 



2 50 



S 00 



$200 

1 00 

I CO 



1250 
300 
300 

S<» 
500 

joo 
5 00 
6o» 
600 



SPALDING'S TRADE-MARKED RATS. 



Probably no class of Sportsmen are more particular about their weapons 
than a professional ball player is about his bat, for it is a recognized fact, 
that no player can excel as a batsman, unless he uses a first-class, well pro- 
portioned, thoroughly -seasoned bat. A cheap, poor hat is no good at any 
- pr,ci r J Ke?'^""-'"*? \ h: l l bil " Players would appreciate a good article, and 
would willingly stand the slight additional expense, about three years ago 
we introduced "Spalding s Trade Marked fiats/' and they proved so popu. 
lar, and were so far ahead of anything else ever put upon the market, that 
for a time it seemed impossible to keep up with the demand We have im- 
proved these bats from year to year, until now they are the bat tar excellence, 
and are used by every prominent professional player in America. 

By permission we publish the following testimonials from some of the 
leading batters ot the country, and as to the general merits of these bats we 
would refer to any prominent professional or amateur player in the United 
States. Beware of cheap imitations which flood the market. None genuine 
without our trade-mark plainly stamped on each bat. 

Your "Trade-Marked Bats " are unquestionably the best bats now manu- 
factured. I have used none others for the past four seasons. They seem to 
be in universal use among all League Players. 

A. C. ANSON, Champion Batter, 1S79 and 1S81. 

A ball player who could not select a satisfactory bat from your various 
models of " Trade-Marked Bats," would be very difficult to please. They 
have my heartiest indorsement. 

GEORGE F. GORE, Champion Batter, 1S80. 

I have used your Trade-Marked Bat during the past few seasons, and con- 
aider them far superior to any other bats I have ever seen. 

A. DALRYMPLE, Champion Batter of 1878. 

1 have used the " Spalding Trade-Marked Bats" during the past four sea- 
ions, and take pleasure in recommending it to the profession as the best in 
the market. 

JAMES WHITE, Champion Batter of 1877. 
Your "Trade-Marked Bats" have my unqualified indorsement. I have 
used no other for the past four years, or since they were introduced. t 
PAUL HINES, of the Providence Club. 
For lightness, shape and durability I consider the " Spalding Bat " away 
ahead ol all others. 

JOE START, of the Providence Club. 

I consider the "Spalding Bat" the most durable, best seasoned and per- 
fect modeled Base Ball Bat made, and recommend them for general use. 
CALVIN A. McVEY, of San Francisco, Cal. 

I have used the " Spalding Bat " and sold the same in my store, and they 
have become the favorite bat in Boston and vicinity. They are thoroughly 
seasoned, finely finished and made after the most approved models. 

GEORGE WRIGHT, Boston, Mass. 

My twenty-one years' experience in Base Ball has afforded me an excel- 
lent opportunity to judge of the merits of Base Ball implements, and Ihave 
no hesitation in saying that the Bats of your manufacture arc superior to 
any I have ever used. ' 

' ROBERT FERGUSON, Capt. Troy Club. 









THE ADOPTED BALL FOR 1882. 

" Spalding's League Ball " enjoys the very highest reputation among the 
base ball players of America, as evidenced by the fact that over 50,000 of these 
balls were sold in 18S0 and 1SS1. In every championship game played last 
season this ball was used, and it gave such universal satisfaction that the 
National .League adopted it again as the official ball for 1&S2. By the new 
rules in every match game of which a record is kept, this ball must be used. 
It is made of the very best of material in accordance with the latest league 
requirements, and every ball warranted to last a game of nine innings, with- 
out ripping or losing its shape. Beware of cheap imitations. None genuine 
without our trade-mark on each box and ball. 

In addition to the League Ball we manufacture a Professional and Amateur 
Dead Ball, and also a full line of the cheaper grades, which are superior to 
any others at the same price. 




Cpaldlng'i Official League Ball, 
Spalding's Professional Dead— Eed or White 
Epalding'a Amateur " " ,l 
Spalding's American Club, each, 75c. 

" King of the Diamond, 50c. 

" Grand Duke f ■ each, 35c. 

** Boy's Favorite, " 25c. 

Liberal discount to dealers, who w 



Par Dozen. 


Simple by V <U 




IACH. 


$15.00 


n.eo 


- 12.00 


1.25 


9.00 


1.00 


Spalding's Eureka, 


each, aoc. 


" Rattler, - 


" 15c. 


Boss, 


■ " i5c. 



Nickel Ball - ■ 05c. 
11 find this line of Balls the cheapest 



and best selling goods now on the market. 

Clubs or dealers ordering one-half dozen balls at one time are entitled U 
our dozen rates. Address orders to 



a. c. 



SPALDING &. BROS., 
108 Madison St., Chicago, ni. 






1 i 



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